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What is the standard test in Perl to determine if a value is a sequence of bytes or an encoded string of characters? And if it's an encoded string, what character encoding is it in?

Let's assume the following complete Perl script:

'foo';

How would one determine if this literal string is a sequence of bytes or a string of characters in some encoding? And if it's a string of characters in some character encoding, what character encoding is it in?

This question is not about Unicode or UTF-8. It's about bytes versus characters in Perl generally. This question is also not about automated character encoding detection, which is a different topic entirely.

UPDATE

After initializing $letter, I want Perl to tell me what character encoding it thinks the letter stored in the variable $letter is in. I don't expect it necessarily to be right. Ensuring that Perl's understanding of what character encoding the letter is in is my responsibility as the programmer. I get that. But there should be a simple, easy way to test what character encoding Perl thinks a character (or string of characters) is in. Isn't there?

C:\>perl -E "$letter = 'Ž'; say $letter =~ m/\w/ ? 'matches' : 'does not match'"
does not match

C:\>perl -MEncode -E "$letter = decode('UTF-8', 'Ž'); say $letter =~ m/\w/ ? 'matches' : 'does not match'"
does not match

C:\>perl -MEncode -E "$letter = decode('Windows-1252', 'Ž'); say $letter =~ m/\w/ ? 'matches' : 'does not match'"
matches

C:\>perl -MEncode -E "$letter = decode('Windows-1252', 'Ž'); $letter = encode('Windows-1252', $letter); say $letter =~ m/\w/ ? 'matches' : 'does not match'"
does not match

C:\>chcp
Active code page: 1252

C:\>

Can't Perl report on demand what character encoding it understands (rightly or wrongly) the value stored in $letter is in?

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Please read stackoverflow.com/questions/6162484/… –  innaM Jul 8 '13 at 8:48
    
@innaM You may be interested to read my recent post on PerlMonks about this same Stack Overflow question and its many fine answers. I've read it many times. –  Jim Monty Jul 8 '13 at 17:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Unlike some other programming languages, such as Python, Perl does not make a distinction between "byte strings" and "Unicode strings". All strings have Unicode semantics, as well as byte semantics.

That being said, there is a purely internal distinction made between strings which contain ASCII, ISO8859-1, or binary data, and strings which contain Unicode data. This distinction is made using the UTF8 flag, which can be checked using the utf8::is_utf8() function. However, keep in mind that this flag is set and cleared automatically -- for instance, appending a non-ISO-8859-1 character (say, ) to a string will reencode any data in the string as UTF-8, if necessary, and set the UTF8 flag. This conversion is invisible to pure-Perl programs, though, so you should rarely need to look at it.

If you have a non-Unicode string (e.g, binary data) and you need to figure out what encoding it is in, see How can I guess the encoding of a string in Perl?.

share|improve this answer
    
I know about utf8::is_utf8() and Encode::is_utf8(), and I know they are functions that report the state of a purely internal flag. My question isn't related to any aspect of Perl's internal representation of strings. I'm asking very specifically what the standard test is for determining whether Perl will use character semantics or byte semantics for any given string. You say "Perl does not make a distinction between 'byte strings' and 'Unicode strings,'" but this isn't the case at all, else what are Encode::decode() and Encode::encode() for? –  Jim Monty Jul 8 '13 at 3:01
    
The documentation of Encode::find_encoding doesn't suggest there's any way to use it to determine what encoding a non-Unicode string (i.e., binary data) is in. Given the name of an encoding, it returns an object corresponding to the encoding with that name. (I can't figure out for what purpose a Perl programmer would use this function.) –  Jim Monty Jul 8 '13 at 3:22
    
@Jim Monty, there's no such thing as "byte semantics" and "character semantics". Perl functions that deal with text (e.g. uc, m//) always expect strings of Unicode code point. There are bugs left in for historical reasons that cause \s to sometimes match NBSP and sometimes not. (Similar for \w and letters in U+0080..U+00FF.) This is based on the result of is_utf8. –  ikegami Jul 8 '13 at 4:08

It's about bytes versus characters in Perl generally.

That makes no sense. Each element of a string is character by definition, so it's definitely a string of characters.

The characters can also be bytes (8-bit values). It's not an either-or thing.

How would one determine if this literal string is a sequence of bytes or a string of characters in some encoding?

You have a string consisting of the characters 66, 6F and 6F. How is Perl suppose to know what those values represent? Are they Unicode code points? Are they HTML encoded using UTF-8? Are they configuration files using UTF-8? Are they temperature sensor measurements? It has no way of knowing. They are simply three values.

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As I explained in my original post, I'm not asking a question about character encoding detection. I simply want to know what the standard test is for determining if something is bytes or characters in Perl's view. And Perl very definitely has a view. –  Jim Monty Jul 8 '13 at 3:50
    
And I explained that's impossible. Perl has no way to know whether 66 is a byte or not (unless you want /^[\x00-\xFF]*\z/. And I've added a bit that sayss it's always going to be a character by definition. –  ikegami Jul 8 '13 at 3:52
    
Re "Perl very definitely has a view.", No, Perl assigns no semantics to the elements of strings. –  ikegami Jul 8 '13 at 3:54
    
Please read Byte and Character Semantics in perlunicode for a better understanding of Perl's byte and character semantic model. –  Jim Monty Jul 8 '13 at 4:15
    
I beg to differ. You should read the replies from amon and I for a better understanding. I'm sure you didn't come here to get the docs quoted to you. –  ikegami Jul 8 '13 at 4:19

There is no file that isn't encoded. The Perl programming language assumes that a source file is in Latin-1 or something. This is a single-byte encoding, so there is a 1:1 mapping between characters and octets. This means that in a file saved with UTF-8 encoding,

length("ø") == 2 and
"ø" eq "\xc3\xb8" and
"ø" ne "\N{LATIN SMALL LETTER O WITH STROKE}"

all of which are not true under use utf8.

In Perl, every string effectively is a sequence of codepoints. Without any decoding steps in the way, every octet will be seen as one codepoint, as demonstrated above. This holds for both string literals in your source file, and IO operations without PerlIO layers.


De- and Encode

The encode function takes a string of codepoints and encodes them with a specified encoding. E.g.

use utf8;
use Test::More; use Encode;

# "is" tests for string equality, "isnt" is the negation

my $str = "ø";
isnt $str, "\xc3\xb8", "String is unencoded";
is length($str), 1,    "Unencoded char has length 1";

my $encoded = encode "UTF-8", $str;
is $encoded, "\xc3\xb8", "The string is properly encoded";
is length($encoded), 2,  "Encoding may map a codepoint to multiple bytes";

This emits a string of bytes, which are represented as codepoints in the range 0x00–0xFF. The encoded string doesn't have an encoding that could be queried; you, the programmer, have to know it. Because it is just a normal string, we could encode it again:

my $double_encoded = encode "UTF-8", $encoded;
is $double_encoded, "\xc3\x83\xc2\xb8", "Double encoding works without type error";

The decode function takes a string of codepoints in the byte range (aka byte string) and transforms it according to the rules of the respective encoding. So:

is decode("utf8", $double_encoded), $encoded, "Decoding works";
is decode("utf8", $encoded),        $str,     "Decoding works 2";

It reverses the encoding step, thereby possibly mapping multiple byte-ranged characters to a single codepoint.

done_testing;
share|improve this answer
    
Understood. So what is the standard test in Perl to determine whether a value has byte semantics or character semantics, and if it has character semantics, what character encoding is it in? (I'm looking for a function.) –  Jim Monty Jul 7 '13 at 23:57
    
There is no such thing: every string is considered a sequence of code points. It just happens that you can treat it as a byte string if all CPs are ≤ 0xFF. So /[^\x00-\xFF]/ might be a start. If you need to know if a string is a bytestring or stringstring, your IO formats might be dubious. –  amon Jul 8 '13 at 0:01
    
In Perl, no string is considered a sequence of code points unless and until the programmer does something explicit to ensure that Perl treats the string as code points (i.e., characters) rather than as bytes. For example, a programmer must use a specific I/O layer (e.g., :encoding(Windows-1252)) or Encode::decode() or some other mechanism. My question is, how do you test the state of Perl's current understanding of a string? Is there not a built-in function to know whether a string has been decoded yet or not? –  Jim Monty Jul 8 '13 at 3:11
    
@Jim Monty, That's not true. In Perl, every string is considered a sequence of code points if it's passed to a uc, m// or another function that deals with text. It's your job to make it so. String functions (e.g. substr, ord) don't assign any meaning whatsoever. –  ikegami Jul 8 '13 at 4:09
    
@JimMonty I added a de- and encode example to my answer. Again, there is no semantic difference between bytestrings and strings, all strings are just naked codepoints in all their unencoded glory. Encoding layers specify a certain string transformation. Some treat the input as byte strings and emit a string containing higher code points. –  amon Jul 8 '13 at 7:17

"Ž" in cp1252 is 8E, so what you perceive as 'Ž' is the same as chr(0x8E).

Keeping that and the following in mind,

decode('UTF-8', chr(0x8E))     ===   chr(0xFFFD)  [Invalid UTF-8]
decode('cp1252', chr(0x8E))    ===   chr(0x17D)
encode('cp1252', chr(0x17D))   ===   chr(0x8E)
  1. Your first snippet passes 0x8E to the match operator. U+008E (SINGLE SHIFT TWO) is not a "word" code point.

    What you are seeing is the effect of passing something other than Unicode code points (cp1252-encoded text) to an operator expecting Unicode code points.

  2. Your second snippet passes 0xFFFD to the match operator. U+FFFD (REPLACEMENT CHARACTER) is not a "word" code point.

    What you are seeing is the effect of passing something other than UTF-8-encoded text (cp1252-encoded text) to a function expecting UTF-8.

  3. Your third snippet passes 0x017D to the match operator. U+017D (LATIN CAPITAL LETTER Z WITH CARON) IS a "word" code point.

  4. Your fourth snippet, like your first snippet, passes 0x8E to the match operator.

    What you are seeing is the effect of passing something other than Unicode code points (cp1252-encoded text) to an operator expecting Unicode code points.

Your update actually demonstrates what previous answers have already told you: The match operator always considers the string to be a string of code points. There's nothing to check, because the behaviour is always the same.

(The passage about "semantics" has no bearing on your update. Correct behaviour is always obtained because of -E.)

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@Jim Monty, That's not true. It's not that you can't report the difference, it's that there is no difference. Everything is being treated the same. (We told you that before you added your update.) –  ikegami Jul 8 '13 at 5:08

Perl lacks a simple way to know what character encoding a string of characters is presumed to be in. It has an internal flag that can be probed to determine if it's own internal representation of the string is UTF-8 or not, but this entirely different than a test to determine the character encoding of a string of characters.

Let us imagine a notional built-in function named encoding(). Here's what it would do:

C:\>perl -E "say encoding 'quick brown fox'"
ISO-8859-1

C:\>perl -E "use utf8; say encoding 'quick brown fox'"
UTF-8

C:\>perl -E "use utf8; say encoding 'γρήγορη καφέ αλεπού'"
UTF-8

C:\>perl -Mutf8 -MEncode -E "say encoding decode('ISO-8859-7', 'γρήγορη καφέ αλεπού')"
ISO-8859-7

C:\>

(The default character encoding is ISO-8859-1, which is also known as Latin 1.)

This really isn't as difficult a question and answer as others have made it seem, which is exactly the point of it. If Perl had a built-in function to report the character encoding assigned to a string of characters, it would serve to make understanding, discussing, and coping with different character encodings a lot easier.

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Having strings in different encodings is not useful at all. (e.g. How would you concat two strings?) You should always normalize your inputs and always re-encode your outputs. This is true in all languages. In Perl, this is done by decoding and encoding. –  ikegami Jul 8 '13 at 5:17
    
There's nothing in my question or answer about "having strings in different encodings." I know you "should always decode your inputs and always encode your outputs." Everyone who understands this stuff knows that. My question had nothing to do with decoding and encoding. I asked an exceedingly simple question for which there is a trivial answer: Perl lacks a function to report the understood encoding of a string. And it's too bad, because it would be vey helpful. –  Jim Monty Jul 8 '13 at 5:20
    
encoding() should always return the same value. Strings would not be useful at all otherwise. (e.g. How would you concat two strings?) You should always normalize your inputs and always re-encode your outputs. This is true in all languages. In Perl, this is done by decoding and encoding. –  ikegami Jul 8 '13 at 5:23
    
You really should spend two seconds listening instead of nitpicking. No, it's not useful to tag strings with their encoding so Perl can "understand" (report) it to you. There's a reason no language does this. –  ikegami Jul 8 '13 at 5:25
2  
It transforms the string so that 8E becomes 17D. It's a simple numerical mapping. Nothing is tagged. // It's no different than $x **= 2;. The value is transformed/mapped to another, but no tag ("square") is attached to it. –  ikegami Jul 8 '13 at 5:35

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