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I've found that the documentation for a variety of Deferred/promise libraries often covers really simple use cases, such as chaining 1 or 2 functions/methods and resulting in a resolved or rejected success or error.

However, when it comes to more complex use cases (chains of 5+ functions/methods; nested Deferreds; returning promises from within other Deferreds), I'm coming up empty-handed and becoming extremely frustrated.

Say, for example, I have a function containing 2 nested functions. Each of the child functions returns a promise, and I want the parent function to return the successful/failed result of the children:

var saveUser = function(user) {
    var saveNewUser = function(user) {
        var deferred = when.defer();

        user.save(function (err) {
            if (err) {
                deferred.reject();
            }
            else {
                // forcing a rejection here for testing purposes
                deferred.reject(6);
            }
        });

        return deferred.promise;
    }

    var supplyUserCollections = function() {
        var deferred = when.defer();

        deferred.reject();

        return deferred.promise;
    }

    return saveNewUser(user).then(supplyUserCollections(), function() {
        console.log('failed to save new user');
    }).then(function(data) {
        console.log('succeeded to do everything');
    }, function() {
        console.log('failed to seed new user collections');
    });
}

This doesn't work; weirdly, the "succeeded to do everything" console.log fires, even though I'm forcing rejections/failures to BOTH child functions. Seeing as the first parameter on a .then is the success case, I really don't get why this is happening. Furthermore, assuming the parent function saveUser is part of another extensive promise chain, such as the following:

dropExistingCollections(collections).then(saveEntities(albums), function() {
    console.log('failed to drop existing collections');
}).then(saveEntities(movies), function() {
    console.log('failed to save all albums');
}).then(saveEntities(games), function() {
    console.log('failed to save all movies');
}).then(saveUsers(users), function() {
    console.log('failed to save all games');    
}).then(function(data) {
    console.log(data);

    console.log('successfully saved all seed data');

    res.send('database data wiped and re-seeded');
}, function() {
    console.log('failed to save all users');
});

I'm not really sure how to properly return a promise from saveUser in a way that's chainable with the rest of the functions, which are all simple functions that return a resolved/rejected Deferred.

I'd really just love more clarification on exactly how some of these more complex use cases for Deferreds/promises are supposed to be handled. It's obviously an extremely dense topic, and most of the material I've found isn't resonating particularly well with me.

share|improve this question
    
Looks like the when library, not jQuery. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Jul 8 '13 at 3:45
    
Are you sure that you're passing [callback] functions to then? Especially .then(supplyUserCollections()) looks like you're passing a promise –  Bergi Jul 8 '13 at 11:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Always start with the synchronous code. It is much easier to understand, and the translation to asynchronous code is never that difficult. If you had included how you would write the synchronous code, rather than just some slightly broken asynchronous code, it would've been much easier for me to work out what you intended the code to do.

Short answer

Your initial problem is probably just that you added parenthesis where you did not mean to. You should always be passing functions to your then handlers:

return saveNewUser(user).then(supplyUserCollections /* NOTE: no parenthesis */, function() {
    console.log('failed to save new user');
}).then(function(data) {
    console.log('succeeded to do everything');
}, function() {
    console.log('failed to seed new user collections');
});

This seems to be your key misunderstanding with the second function as well.

Long answer

Imagining that the code you wanted to write might have looked something like the following (if there was a saveSync method as well as a save method on the user).

function saveNewUser(user) {
  var result = user.saveSync();//may throw
  // forcing a throw here for testing purposes
  throw 6;
}

function supplyUserCollections() {
  throw new Error('failed supplyUserCollections');
}

function saveUser(user) {
  try {
    saveNewUser(user);
  } catch (ex) {
    console.log('failed to save new user');
    return;
  }
  try {
    supplyUserCollections();
  } catch (ex) {
    console.log('failed to seed new user collections');
    return;
  }
  console.log('succeeded to do everything');
}

Now we can convert saveNewUser and supplyUserCollections very simply:

function saveNewUser(user) {
  var deferred = when.defer();

  user.save(function (err) {
    if (err) {
      deferred.reject();
    }
    else {
      // forcing a rejection here for testing purposes
      deferred.reject(6);
    }
  });

  return deferred.promise;
}

function supplyUserCollections() {
  var deferred = when.defer();

  deferred.reject();

  return deferred.promise;
}

Having done this, we just need conver the more complex saveUser method:

function saveUser(user) {
  saveNewUser(user)
    .then(function () {
      //this only happens if `saveNewUser` succeeded, like the bit after
      //a catch block containing a `return`
      return supplyUserCollections()
        .then(function () {
          console.log('succeeded to do everything');
        }, function (ex) {
          console.log('failed to seed new user collections');
        })
    }, function (ex) {
      //this happens when `saveNewUser` failed (just like the catch block)
      console.log('failed to save new user');
    })
}

Now it seems to me that a more likely version of the synchronous function might be something like:

function saveUser(user) {
  saveNewUser(user);
  supplyUserCollections();
  console.log('succeeded to do everything');
}

Which you could write as:

function saveUser(user) {
  saveNewUser(user)
    .then(function () {
      //this only happens if `saveNewUser` succeeded
      return supplyUserCollections()
    })
    .then(function () {
      //this happens when both methods succeeded
      console.log('succeeded to do everything');
    })
}
share|improve this answer
    
This definitely cleared up the majority of my issues, so thanks a bunch. Mariusz's answer cleared up the rest. I'm finding that the documentation for many of these libraries leaves much to be desired; for example, I didn't see anywhere in when.js's docs that blatantly explained how to handle errors only at the end of the chain. Ahh, well. Thanks again. –  J. Ky Marsh Jul 10 '13 at 5:24

If you fix parenthesis issue (pointed by Forbes), then your first example should output:

failed to save new user
succeeded to do everything

So now you may question, why it shows succeeded to do everything when it failed with initial step. It is, because in your flow, you surpassed initial error, and got back on success track. To maintain error state, you need to re-throw same error in a callback:

saveNewUser(user).then(supplyUserCollections(), function(err) {
    console.log('failed to save new user');
    throw err; // Re-throw to maintain error state
})

Having that, you should see:

failed to save new user
failed to seed new user collections

Still your flow doesn't resemble best practice. First thing: you should clearly know at which step your flow crashed just by content of error message, and you should not listen for errors at each step, it's obsolete and overly verbose.

Let's say that saveNewUser may crash with Cannot save user error, and supplyUserCollections may crash with Cannot seed new user collections. Your flow should be simple as that:

saveNewUser(user).then(supplyUserCollections).done(function () {
    console.log("Success!");
}, function (err) {
    console.error(err.message);
});

Then if any of the steps crashes, you'll see corresponding message, and that's how you should effectively work with promises. In most cases you need to handle errors once just at the end of chain.

share|improve this answer
    
Forbes' answer was a bit more thorough, but yours did help a lot as far as understanding error propagation. It seems that the core idea is to explicitly return/throw a result at each step along the chain, because without doing so, it becomes unclear at which point a success/failure occurred. I am a bit confused as to why you've used done() to indicate the final step in a chain; coming from jQuery's deferreds, done() indicates successful completion. Should I assume jQuery simply isn't adhering to the Promises standards? –  J. Ky Marsh Jul 10 '13 at 5:27
1  
jQuery's implementation doesn't adhere to promise standard in few places, better unlearn it :) ..and done is crucial to escape internal error handling, you should always use it instead of then if you're not interested in further promise transformation and just want to process final result –  Mariusz Nowak Jul 10 '13 at 8:27

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