Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I used gcc-4.8.1(configure: ./configure --prefix=/usr/local) to compile following code in Ubuntu 12.04, but when I ran it, it didn't work. it didn't stop to wait the mutex. It returned false, and outputed "Hello world!"

command: g++ -std=c++11 main.cpp -omain -pthread

When I used gcc-4.6(apt-get install g++) to compile it, it worked well. The program waited about ten seconds, and outputed "Hello world!"

#include <thread>
#include <iostream>
#include <chrono>
#include <mutex>

std::timed_mutex test_mutex;

void f()
{
    test_mutex.try_lock_for(std::chrono::seconds(10));
    std::cout << "hello world\n";
}

int main()
{
    std::lock_guard<std::timed_mutex> l(test_mutex);
    std::thread t(f);
    t.join();
      return 0;
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If I am not mistaken, that is Bug 54562 -mutex and condition variable timers.

The reason for the bug is also mentioned:

This is because it uses the CLOCK_MONOTONIC clock (if available on the platform) to calculate the absolute time when it needs to return, which is incorrect as the POSIX pthread_mutex_timedlock() call uses the CLOCK_REALTIME clock, and on my platform the monotonic clock is way behind the real time clock.

However, this doesn't explain why you see the correct behavior on gcc-4.6 though. Perhaps _GLIBCXX_USE_CLOCK_MONOTONIC is not enabled?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, when I disenable _GLIBCXX_USE_CLOCK_MONOTONIC, gcc-4.8 and gcc-4.6 have same behavior. And I think that the reason why they have different behavior is this marco . –  miskcoo Jul 8 '13 at 13:10
    
For anyone wanting to upgrade gcc/g++ to 4.9 (where the bug has been fixed), then follow these instructions for Ubuntu, just replacing 4.6 with 4.9. –  Garrett Jul 21 '14 at 9:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.