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I have a struct:

struct S {
    public readonly int Value1;
    public readonly int Value2;
    public S(int value1, int value2) {
        this.Value1 = value1;
        this.Value2 = value2;
    }
}

and I try to take the address of Value2:

var s = default(S);
unsafe {
    var r = new IntPtr(&s.Value2);
}

but I get a compiler error:

Cannot take the address of the given expression

I thought I could take the addresses of fields? What's going on?

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That's a similar question, but resolution is entirely different. The issue was syntactic, not semantic. Plus the only mention of readonly is a slightly-wrong answer which appears to be talking about the result-is-a-copy-ness rather than the readonly-ness. –  Strilanc Jul 8 '13 at 4:08

2 Answers 2

It makes sense that a readonly value cannot have a pointer to it because its value could be changed by dereferencing the pointer, which would effectively break its readonly quality.

However, I've got a solution for you, but you may not like it.

Firstly, make the fields private and non-readonly. Secondly, make them accessable via get-only properties. Thirdly, add properties that return the int pointers to the non-readonly fields.

As a demonstration:

struct S
        {
            private int value1;
            private int value2;
            public S(int value1, int value2)
            {
                this.value1 = value1;
                this.value2 = value2;
            }
            public int Value1 { get { return value1; } }
            public int Value2 { get { return value2; } }
            public unsafe IntPtr Value1Ptr
            {
                get
                {
                    fixed (int* ptr = &value1)
                    {
                        return new IntPtr(ptr);
                    }
                }
            }
            public unsafe IntPtr Value2Ptr
            {
                get
                {
                    fixed (int* ptr = &value2)
                    {
                        return new IntPtr(ptr);
                    }
                }
            }
        }

I've also tested, if you make the fields public and try to make the pointer outside of the struct, it returns the same value. It's a horrible hack, but it achieves what you want - readonly values that can give pointers.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Apparently it doesn't work with readonly fields. Changing S to this:

struct S {
    public int Value1;
    public int Value2;
}

fixes the problem.

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