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Short Version

Calls to CommandManager.InvalidateRequerySuggested() take far longer to take effect than I would like (1-2 second delay before UI controls become disabled).

Long Version

I have a system where I submit tasks to a background-thread based task processor. This submit happens on the WPF UI thread.

When this submit happens, the object that manages my background thread does two things:

  1. It raises a "busy" event (still on the UI thread) that several view models respond to; when they receive this event, they set an IsEnabled flag on themselves to false. Controls in my views, which are databound to this property, are immediately grayed out, which is what I would expect.

  2. It informs my WPF ICommand objects that they should not be allowed to execute (again, still on the UI thread). Because there is nothing like INotifyPropertyChanged for ICommand objects, I am forced to call CommandManager.InvalidateRequerySuggested() to force WPF to reconsider all of my command objects' CanExecute states (yes, I actually do need to do this: otherwise, none of these controls become disabled). Unlike item 1, though, it takes a significantly longer time for my buttons/menu items/etc that are using ICommand objects to visually change to a disabled state than it does for the UI controls that have their IsEnabled property manually set.

The problem is, from a UX point of view, this looks awful; half of my controls are immediately grayed out (because their IsEnabled property is set to false), and then a full 1-2 seconds later, the other half of my controls follow suit (because their CanExecute methods are finally re-evaluated).

So, part 1 of my question:
As silly as it sounds to ask, is there a way I can make CommandManager.InvalidateRequerySuggested() do it's job faster? I suspect that there isn't.

Fair enough, part 2 of my question:
How can I work around this? I'd prefer all of my controls be disabled at the same time. It just looks unprofessional and awkward otherwise. Any ideas? :-)

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 40 down vote accepted

CommandManager.InvalidateRequerySuggested() tries to validate all commands, which is totally ineffective (and in your case slow) - on every change, you are asking every command to recheck its CanExecute()!

You'd need the command to know on which objects and properties is its CanExecute dependent, and suggest requery only when they change. That way, if you change a property of an object, only commands that depend on it will change their state.

This is how I solved the problem, but at first, a teaser:

// in ViewModel's constructor - add a code to public ICommand:
this.DoStuffWithParameterCommand = new DelegateCommand<object>(
    parameter =>
        {
            //do work with parameter (remember to check against null)
        },
    parameter => 
        {
            //can this command execute? return true or false
        }
    )
    .ListenOn(whichObject, n => n.ObjectProperty /*type safe!*/, this.Dispatcher /*we need to pass UI dispatcher here*/)
    .ListenOn(anotherObject, n => n.AnotherObjectProperty, this.Dispatcher); // chain calling!

The command is listening on NotifyPropertyChanged events from object that affect whether it can execute, and invokes the check only when a requery is needed.

Now, a lot of code (part of our in-house framework) to do this:

I use DelegateCommand from Prism, that looks like this:

/// <summary>
///     This class allows delegating the commanding logic to methods passed as parameters,
///     and enables a View to bind commands to objects that are not part of the element tree.
/// </summary>
public class DelegateCommand : ICommand
{
    #region Constructors

    /// <summary>
    ///     Constructor
    /// </summary>
    public DelegateCommand(Action executeMethod)
        : this(executeMethod, null, false)
    {
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///     Constructor
    /// </summary>
    public DelegateCommand(Action executeMethod, Func<bool> canExecuteMethod)
        : this(executeMethod, canExecuteMethod, false)
    {
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///     Constructor
    /// </summary>
    public DelegateCommand(Action executeMethod, Func<bool> canExecuteMethod, bool isAutomaticRequeryDisabled)
    {
        if (executeMethod == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("executeMethod");
        }

        _executeMethod = executeMethod;
        _canExecuteMethod = canExecuteMethod;
        _isAutomaticRequeryDisabled = isAutomaticRequeryDisabled;

        this.RaiseCanExecuteChanged();
    }

    #endregion

    #region Public Methods

    /// <summary>
    ///     Method to determine if the command can be executed
    /// </summary>
    public bool CanExecute()
    {
        if (_canExecuteMethod != null)
        {
            return _canExecuteMethod();
        }
        return true;
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///     Execution of the command
    /// </summary>
    public void Execute()
    {
        if (_executeMethod != null)
        {
            _executeMethod();
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///     Property to enable or disable CommandManager's automatic requery on this command
    /// </summary>
    public bool IsAutomaticRequeryDisabled
    {
        get
        {
            return _isAutomaticRequeryDisabled;
        }
        set
        {
            if (_isAutomaticRequeryDisabled != value)
            {
                if (value)
                {
                    CommandManagerHelper.RemoveHandlersFromRequerySuggested(_canExecuteChangedHandlers);
                }
                else
                {
                    CommandManagerHelper.AddHandlersToRequerySuggested(_canExecuteChangedHandlers);
                }
                _isAutomaticRequeryDisabled = value;
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///     Raises the CanExecuteChaged event
    /// </summary>
    public void RaiseCanExecuteChanged()
    {
        OnCanExecuteChanged();
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///     Protected virtual method to raise CanExecuteChanged event
    /// </summary>
    protected virtual void OnCanExecuteChanged()
    {
        CommandManagerHelper.CallWeakReferenceHandlers(_canExecuteChangedHandlers);
    }

    #endregion

    #region ICommand Members

    /// <summary>
    ///     ICommand.CanExecuteChanged implementation
    /// </summary>
    public event EventHandler CanExecuteChanged
    {
        add
        {
            if (!_isAutomaticRequeryDisabled)
            {
                CommandManager.RequerySuggested += value;
            }
            CommandManagerHelper.AddWeakReferenceHandler(ref _canExecuteChangedHandlers, value, 2);
        }
        remove
        {
            if (!_isAutomaticRequeryDisabled)
            {
                CommandManager.RequerySuggested -= value;
            }
            CommandManagerHelper.RemoveWeakReferenceHandler(_canExecuteChangedHandlers, value);
        }
    }

    bool ICommand.CanExecute(object parameter)
    {
        return CanExecute();
    }

    void ICommand.Execute(object parameter)
    {
        Execute();
    }

    #endregion

    #region Data

    private readonly Action _executeMethod = null;
    private readonly Func<bool> _canExecuteMethod = null;
    private bool _isAutomaticRequeryDisabled = false;
    private List<WeakReference> _canExecuteChangedHandlers;

    #endregion
}

/// <summary>
///     This class allows delegating the commanding logic to methods passed as parameters,
///     and enables a View to bind commands to objects that are not part of the element tree.
/// </summary>
/// <typeparam name="T">Type of the parameter passed to the delegates</typeparam>
public class DelegateCommand<T> : ICommand
{
    #region Constructors

    /// <summary>
    ///     Constructor
    /// </summary>
    public DelegateCommand(Action<T> executeMethod)
        : this(executeMethod, null, false)
    {
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///     Constructor
    /// </summary>
    public DelegateCommand(Action<T> executeMethod, Func<T, bool> canExecuteMethod)
        : this(executeMethod, canExecuteMethod, false)
    {
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///     Constructor
    /// </summary>
    public DelegateCommand(Action<T> executeMethod, Func<T, bool> canExecuteMethod, bool isAutomaticRequeryDisabled)
    {
        if (executeMethod == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("executeMethod");
        }

        _executeMethod = executeMethod;
        _canExecuteMethod = canExecuteMethod;
        _isAutomaticRequeryDisabled = isAutomaticRequeryDisabled;
    }

    #endregion

    #region Public Methods

    /// <summary>
    ///     Method to determine if the command can be executed
    /// </summary>
    public bool CanExecute(T parameter)
    {
        if (_canExecuteMethod != null)
        {
            return _canExecuteMethod(parameter);
        }
        return true;
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///     Execution of the command
    /// </summary>
    public void Execute(T parameter)
    {
        if (_executeMethod != null)
        {
            _executeMethod(parameter);
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///     Raises the CanExecuteChaged event
    /// </summary>
    public void RaiseCanExecuteChanged()
    {
        OnCanExecuteChanged();
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///     Protected virtual method to raise CanExecuteChanged event
    /// </summary>
    protected virtual void OnCanExecuteChanged()
    {
        CommandManagerHelper.CallWeakReferenceHandlers(_canExecuteChangedHandlers);
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///     Property to enable or disable CommandManager's automatic requery on this command
    /// </summary>
    public bool IsAutomaticRequeryDisabled
    {
        get
        {
            return _isAutomaticRequeryDisabled;
        }
        set
        {
            if (_isAutomaticRequeryDisabled != value)
            {
                if (value)
                {
                    CommandManagerHelper.RemoveHandlersFromRequerySuggested(_canExecuteChangedHandlers);
                }
                else
                {
                    CommandManagerHelper.AddHandlersToRequerySuggested(_canExecuteChangedHandlers);
                }
                _isAutomaticRequeryDisabled = value;
            }
        }
    }

    #endregion

    #region ICommand Members

    /// <summary>
    ///     ICommand.CanExecuteChanged implementation
    /// </summary>
    public event EventHandler CanExecuteChanged
    {
        add
        {
            if (!_isAutomaticRequeryDisabled)
            {
                CommandManager.RequerySuggested += value;
            }
            CommandManagerHelper.AddWeakReferenceHandler(ref _canExecuteChangedHandlers, value, 2);
        }
        remove
        {
            if (!_isAutomaticRequeryDisabled)
            {
                CommandManager.RequerySuggested -= value;
            }
            CommandManagerHelper.RemoveWeakReferenceHandler(_canExecuteChangedHandlers, value);
        }
    }

    bool ICommand.CanExecute(object parameter)
    {
        // if T is of value type and the parameter is not
        // set yet, then return false if CanExecute delegate
        // exists, else return true
        if (parameter == null &&
            typeof(T).IsValueType)
        {
            return (_canExecuteMethod == null);
        }
        return CanExecute((T)parameter);
    }

    void ICommand.Execute(object parameter)
    {
        Execute((T)parameter);
    }

    #endregion

    #region Data

    private readonly Action<T> _executeMethod = null;
    private readonly Func<T, bool> _canExecuteMethod = null;
    private bool _isAutomaticRequeryDisabled = false;
    private List<WeakReference> _canExecuteChangedHandlers;

    #endregion
}

/// <summary>
///     This class contains methods for the CommandManager that help avoid memory leaks by
///     using weak references.
/// </summary>
internal class CommandManagerHelper
{
    internal static void CallWeakReferenceHandlers(List<WeakReference> handlers)
    {
        if (handlers != null)
        {
            // Take a snapshot of the handlers before we call out to them since the handlers
            // could cause the array to me modified while we are reading it.

            EventHandler[] callees = new EventHandler[handlers.Count];
            int count = 0;

            for (int i = handlers.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
            {
                WeakReference reference = handlers[i];
                EventHandler handler = reference.Target as EventHandler;
                if (handler == null)
                {
                    // Clean up old handlers that have been collected
                    handlers.RemoveAt(i);
                }
                else
                {
                    callees[count] = handler;
                    count++;
                }
            }

            // Call the handlers that we snapshotted
            for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
            {
                EventHandler handler = callees[i];
                handler(null, EventArgs.Empty);
            }
        }
    }

    internal static void AddHandlersToRequerySuggested(List<WeakReference> handlers)
    {
        if (handlers != null)
        {
            foreach (WeakReference handlerRef in handlers)
            {
                EventHandler handler = handlerRef.Target as EventHandler;
                if (handler != null)
                {
                    CommandManager.RequerySuggested += handler;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    internal static void RemoveHandlersFromRequerySuggested(List<WeakReference> handlers)
    {
        if (handlers != null)
        {
            foreach (WeakReference handlerRef in handlers)
            {
                EventHandler handler = handlerRef.Target as EventHandler;
                if (handler != null)
                {
                    CommandManager.RequerySuggested -= handler;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    internal static void AddWeakReferenceHandler(ref List<WeakReference> handlers, EventHandler handler)
    {
        AddWeakReferenceHandler(ref handlers, handler, -1);
    }

    internal static void AddWeakReferenceHandler(ref List<WeakReference> handlers, EventHandler handler, int defaultListSize)
    {
        if (handlers == null)
        {
            handlers = (defaultListSize > 0 ? new List<WeakReference>(defaultListSize) : new List<WeakReference>());
        }

        handlers.Add(new WeakReference(handler));
    }

    internal static void RemoveWeakReferenceHandler(List<WeakReference> handlers, EventHandler handler)
    {
        if (handlers != null)
        {
            for (int i = handlers.Count - 1; i >= 0; i--)
            {
                WeakReference reference = handlers[i];
                EventHandler existingHandler = reference.Target as EventHandler;
                if ((existingHandler == null) || (existingHandler == handler))
                {
                    // Clean up old handlers that have been collected
                    // in addition to the handler that is to be removed.
                    handlers.RemoveAt(i);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

I have then written a ListenOn extension method, that 'binds' the command to a property, and invokes its RaiseCanExecuteChanged:

public static class DelegateCommandExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Makes DelegateCommnand listen on PropertyChanged events of some object,
    /// so that DelegateCommnand can update its IsEnabled property.
    /// </summary>
    public static DelegateCommand ListenOn<ObservedType, PropertyType>
        (this DelegateCommand delegateCommand, 
        ObservedType observedObject, 
        Expression<Func<ObservedType, PropertyType>> propertyExpression,
        Dispatcher dispatcher)
        where ObservedType : INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
        //string propertyName = observedObject.GetPropertyName(propertyExpression);
        string propertyName = NotifyPropertyChangedBaseExtensions.GetPropertyName(propertyExpression);

        observedObject.PropertyChanged += (sender, e) =>
        {
            if (e.PropertyName == propertyName)
            {
                if (dispatcher != null)
                {
                    ThreadTools.RunInDispatcher(dispatcher, delegateCommand.RaiseCanExecuteChanged);
                }
                else
                {
                    delegateCommand.RaiseCanExecuteChanged();
                }
            }
        };

        return delegateCommand; //chain calling
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Makes DelegateCommnand listen on PropertyChanged events of some object,
    /// so that DelegateCommnand can update its IsEnabled property.
    /// </summary>
    public static DelegateCommand<T> ListenOn<T, ObservedType, PropertyType>
        (this DelegateCommand<T> delegateCommand, 
        ObservedType observedObject, 
        Expression<Func<ObservedType, PropertyType>> propertyExpression,
        Dispatcher dispatcher)
        where ObservedType : INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
        //string propertyName = observedObject.GetPropertyName(propertyExpression);
        string propertyName = NotifyPropertyChangedBaseExtensions.GetPropertyName(propertyExpression);

        observedObject.PropertyChanged += (object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e) =>
        {
            if (e.PropertyName == propertyName)
            {
                if (dispatcher != null)
                {
                    ThreadTools.RunInDispatcher(dispatcher, delegateCommand.RaiseCanExecuteChanged);
                }
                else
                {
                    delegateCommand.RaiseCanExecuteChanged();
                }
            }
        };

        return delegateCommand; //chain calling
    }
}

You then need the following extension to NotifyPropertyChanged

    /// <summary>
/// <see cref="http://dotnet.dzone.com/news/silverlightwpf-implementing"/>
/// </summary>
public static class NotifyPropertyChangedBaseExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Raises PropertyChanged event.
    /// To use: call the extension method with this: this.OnPropertyChanged(n => n.Title);
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">Property owner</typeparam>
    /// <typeparam name="TProperty">Type of property</typeparam>
    /// <param name="observableBase"></param>
    /// <param name="expression">Property expression like 'n => n.Property'</param>
    public static void OnPropertyChanged<T, TProperty>(this T observableBase, Expression<Func<T, TProperty>> expression) where T : INotifyPropertyChangedWithRaise
    {
        observableBase.OnPropertyChanged(GetPropertyName<T, TProperty>(expression));
    }

    public static string GetPropertyName<T, TProperty>(Expression<Func<T, TProperty>> expression) where T : INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
        if (expression == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("expression");

        var lambda = expression as LambdaExpression;
        MemberExpression memberExpression;
        if (lambda.Body is UnaryExpression)
        {
            var unaryExpression = lambda.Body as UnaryExpression;
            memberExpression = unaryExpression.Operand as MemberExpression;
        }
        else
        {
            memberExpression = lambda.Body as MemberExpression;
        }

        if (memberExpression == null)
            throw new ArgumentException("Please provide a lambda expression like 'n => n.PropertyName'");

        MemberInfo memberInfo = memberExpression.Member;

        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(memberInfo.Name))
            throw new ArgumentException("'expression' did not provide a property name.");

        return memberInfo.Name;
    }
}

where INotifyPropertyChangedWithRaise is this (it estabilishes standard interface for raising NotifyPropertyChanged events):

public interface INotifyPropertyChangedWithRaise : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName);
}

Last piece of puzzle is this:

public class ThreadTools
{
    public static void RunInDispatcher(Dispatcher dispatcher, Action action)
    {
        RunInDispatcher(dispatcher, DispatcherPriority.Normal, action);
    }

        public static void RunInDispatcher(Dispatcher dispatcher, DispatcherPriority priority, Action action)
    {
        if (action == null) { return; }

        if (dispatcher.CheckAccess())
        {
            // we are already on thread associated with the dispatcher -> just call action
            try
            {
                action();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                //Log error here!
            }
        }
        else
        {
            // we are on different thread, invoke action on dispatcher's thread
            dispatcher.BeginInvoke(
                priority,
                (Action)(
                () =>
                {
                    try
                    {
                        action();
                    }
                    catch (Exception ex)
                    {
                        //Log error here!
                    }
                })
            );
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow! Thank you so much for this, this looks incredibly helpful. I can't wait to try it out :-)! –  unforgiven3 Dec 7 '09 at 16:51
    
You're welcome, it's quite a lot of code, but you can then use the OnPropertyChanged extension method to raise NotifyPropertyChanged as well - like: this.OnPropertyChanged(n => n.MyProperty). The one problematic point is that comand listening on event could in some cases cause memory leak - it should use some weak event listener instead of observedObject.PropertyChanged += ..., but I haven't yet found time to understand all .net internals involved in that. –  Tomáš Kafka Dec 7 '09 at 20:51
1  
+1, awesome answer ! I especially love the idea of the ListenOn, that's pretty clever and elegant –  Thomas Levesque Apr 6 '10 at 20:51
    
@TomášKafka seems like a great solution, but if I call RaiseCanExecuteChanged on one of my commands only, all other commands are updated as well ie it looks like it's doing the same as InvalidateRequerySuggested. Any idea what might be going on? I do not use ListenOn, but just call the RaiseCanExecuteChanged on the UI dispatcher. –  stijn Dec 1 '11 at 11:06

This solution is a reduced version of the solution proposed by Tomáš Kafka(thanks to Tomas for describing his solution in detail)in this thread.

In Tomas's solution he had 1) DelegateCommand 2) CommandManagerHelper 3) DelegateCommandExtensions 4) NotifyPropertyChangedBaseExtensions 5) INotifyPropertyChangedWithRaise 6) ThreadTools

This solution has 1) DelegateCommand 2) DelegateCommandExtensions method and NotifyPropertyChangedBaseExtensions method in Delegate Command itself.

Note Since our wpf application follows MVVM pattern and we handle commands at viewmodel level which executes in UI thread we don't need to get the reference to UI disptacher.

   using System;
   using System.Collections.Generic;
   using System.ComponentModel;
   using System.Linq.Expressions;
   using System.Reflection;
   using System.Windows.Input;
   namespace ExampleForDelegateCommand
   {
   public class DelegateCommand : ICommand
   {

    public Predicate<object> CanExecuteDelegate { get; set; }

    private List<INotifyPropertyChanged> propertiesToListenTo;
    private List<WeakReference> ControlEvent;

    public DelegateCommand()
    {
        ControlEvent= new List<WeakReference>();
    }

    public List<INotifyPropertyChanged> PropertiesToListenTo
    {
        get { return propertiesToListenTo; }
        set
        {
            propertiesToListenTo = value;
        }
    }

    private Action<object> executeDelegate;

    public Action<object> ExecuteDelegate
    {
        get { return executeDelegate; }
        set
        {
            executeDelegate = value;
            ListenForNotificationFrom((INotifyPropertyChanged)executeDelegate.Target);
        }
    }

    public static ICommand Create(Action<object> exec)
    {
        return new SimpleCommand { ExecuteDelegate = exec };
    }



    #region ICommand Members


    public bool CanExecute(object parameter)
    {
        if (CanExecuteDelegate != null)
            return CanExecuteDelegate(parameter);
        return true; // if there is no can execute default to true
    }

    public event EventHandler CanExecuteChanged
    {
        add
        {
            CommandManager.RequerySuggested += value;
            ControlEvent.Add(new WeakReference(value));
        }
        remove
        {
            CommandManager.RequerySuggested -= value;
            ControlEvent.Remove(ControlEvent.Find(r => ((EventHandler) r.Target) == value));
        }
    }

    public void Execute(object parameter)
    {
        if (ExecuteDelegate != null)
            ExecuteDelegate(parameter);
    }
     #endregion

    public void RaiseCanExecuteChanged()
    {
        if (ControlEvent != null && ControlEvent.Count > 0)
        {
            ControlEvent.ForEach(ce =>
                                     {
                                         if(ce.Target!=null)
                                         ((EventHandler) (ce.Target)).Invoke(null, EventArgs.Empty);
                                     });
        }
    }



    public DelegateCommand ListenOn<TObservedType, TPropertyType>(TObservedType viewModel, Expression<Func<TObservedType, TPropertyType>> propertyExpression) where TObservedType : INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
        string propertyName = GetPropertyName(propertyExpression);
        viewModel.PropertyChanged += (PropertyChangedEventHandler)((sender, e) =>
        {
            if (e.PropertyName == propertyName) RaiseCanExecuteChanged();
        });
        return this;
    }

    public void ListenForNotificationFrom<TObservedType>(TObservedType viewModel) where TObservedType : INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
        viewModel.PropertyChanged += (PropertyChangedEventHandler)((sender, e) =>
        {
           RaiseCanExecuteChanged();
        });
    }

    private string GetPropertyName<T, TProperty>(Expression<Func<T, TProperty>> expression) where T : INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
        var lambda = expression as LambdaExpression;
        MemberInfo memberInfo = GetmemberExpression(lambda).Member;
        return memberInfo.Name;
    }

    private MemberExpression GetmemberExpression(LambdaExpression lambda)
    {
        MemberExpression memberExpression;
        if (lambda.Body is UnaryExpression)
        {
            var unaryExpression = lambda.Body as UnaryExpression;
            memberExpression = unaryExpression.Operand as MemberExpression;
        }
        else
            memberExpression = lambda.Body as MemberExpression;
        return memberExpression;
    }

}}

Explanation of the solution:

Normally when we bind a UI element(Button)to the ICommand implementation the WPF Button registers for a Event "CanExecuteChanged" in ICommand implementation .If your Icommand implementation for "CanExecuteChanged" hook to the CommandManager's RequesySuggest event(read this article http://joshsmithonwpf.wordpress.com/2008/06/17/allowing-commandmanager-to-query-your-icommand-objects/) then when ever CommandManager detects conditions that might change the ability of a command to execute(changes like Focus shifts and some keyboard events) , CommandManager’s RequerySuggested event occurs which in turn will cause Button'e delegate to be called since we hooked the buttos's delgate to CommandManager’s RequerySuggested in the implementation of "CanExecuteChanged" in our DelegateCommand .

But the problem is that ComandManager is not able to always detect the changes. Hence the solution it to raise "CanExecuteChanged" when our command implementation(DelegateCommand) detects there is a change.Normally when we declare the delagate for ICommand's CanExecute in our viewmodel we bind to properties declared in our viewmodel and our ICommand implementation can listen for "propertychanged" events on these properties. Thats what the "ListenForNotificationFrom" method of the DelegateCommand does. In case the client code does not register for specific property changes the DelegateCommand by defaults listens to any property change on the view model where command is declared and defined.

"ControlEvent" in DelegateCommand which is list of EventHandler that stores the Button's "CanExecuteChange EventHandler" is declared as weak reference to avoid memory leaks.

How will ViewModel use this DelegateCommand There are 2 ways to use it. (the second usage is more specific to the properties that you want the Command to listen to.

delegateCommand = new DelegateCommand
                                      {
                                          ExecuteDelegate = Search,
                                          CanExecuteDelegate = (r) => !IsBusy
                                      };

          anotherDelegateCommand = new DelegateCommand
                                      {
                                          ExecuteDelegate = SearchOne,
                                          CanExecuteDelegate = (r) => !IsBusyOne
                                      }.ListenOn(this, n => n.IsBusyOne);

A detailed ViewModel

  public class ExampleViewModel
 {
   public SearchViewModelBase()
    {
        delegateCommand = new DelegateCommand
                                      {
                                          ExecuteDelegate = Search,
                                          CanExecuteDelegate = (r) => !IsBusy
                                      };

          anotherDelegateCommand = new DelegateCommand
                                      {
                                          ExecuteDelegate = SearchOne,
                                          CanExecuteDelegate = (r) => !IsBusyOne
                                      }.ListenOn(this, n => n.IsBusyOne);
  }
  private bool isBusy;
   public virtual bool IsBusy
    {
        get { return isBusy; }
        set
        {
            if (isBusy == value) return;
            isBusy = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged(MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod());
        }
    }
    private bool isBusyOne;
     public virtual bool IsBusyOne
    {
        get { return isBusyOne; }
        set
        {
            if (isBusyOne == value) return;
            isBusyOne = value;
            NotifyPropertyChanged(MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod());
        }
    }


    private void Search(object obj)
    {
        IsBusy = true;
        new SearchService().Search(Callback);
    }  
    public void Callback(ServiceResponse response)
    {
        IsBusy = false;
    }  

    private void Search(object obj)
    {
        IsBusyOne = true;
        new SearchService().Search(CallbackOne);
    }  
    public void CallbackOne(ServiceResponse response)
    {
        IsBusyOne = false;
    }          
    private void NotifyPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    } 

    private void NotifyPropertyChanged(MethodBase methodBase)
    {
        string methodName = methodBase.Name;

        if (!methodName.StartsWith("set_"))
        {
            var ex = new ArgumentException("MethodBase must refer to a Property Setter method.");
            throw ex;
        }
        NotifyPropertyChanged(methodName.Substring(4));
    }

}

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I'm using your solution, but in some circumstances that I don't exactly know, it doesn't work. I have to call InvalidateRequerySuggested anyway. Do you know what can prevent your solution from working? –  MTR Nov 26 '12 at 6:46

Tomas has a nice solution, but pls note there's a serious bug in that the CanExecute will not always fire when bound to a Button due to this :

// Call the handlers that we snapshotted
for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
{
            EventHandler handler = callees[i];
            handler(null, EventArgs.Empty);
}

The 'null' parameter passed in causes issues with the CanExecuteChangedEventManager (used by the WPF Button class to listen to changes on any Command bound to it). Specifically, the CanExecuteChangedEventManager maintains a collection of weak events that need to be invoked to determine if the command Can-Execute() but this collection is keyed by the 'sender'.

The fix is simple and works for me - change the signature to

internal static void CallWeakReferenceHandlers(ICommand sender, List<WeakReference> handlers)
{
....
           handler(sender, EventArgs.Empty);
 }

Sorry I haven't described it too well - in a bit of a rush to catch up with my dev now after taking a few hours to figure this out !

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Try writing your own binding that calls your RaiseCanExecuteChanged() within converts? it is easier

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Just to clarify:

  1. You want to fire an update of CanExecute when Command property changed
  2. Create your own binding class that detect changes in the Command property and then calls RaiseCanExecuteChanged()
  3. Use this binding in CommandParameter

Worked for me.

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I would suggest looking into ReactiveUI and specifically at the ICommand implementation it provides, ReactiveCommand. It uses a different approach than DelegateCommand/RelayCommand which are implemented with delegates for CanExecute that must be actively evaluated. ReactiveCommand's value for CanExecute is pushed using IObservables.

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