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x.h

class X
{
public:
    template<typename T1, typename T2>
    struct Bar
    {
    public:
        template<typename T1> void bar(T2 const& t2);
    };
}

x.cpp

How do I define the function?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by jogojapan, interjay, MSalters, macduff, Siddharth Jul 8 '13 at 14:33

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
I think it would help if you could explain what the goal is. The way it's written, I don't understand the intention. But as a general remark, definitions of template functions are usually found in the header, not in the .cpp file. –  jogojapan Jul 8 '13 at 6:58
    
possible duplicate of Why can templates only be implemented in the header file? –  MSalters Jul 8 '13 at 14:20
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3 Answers

You have a problem, T1 overshadows the T1 in struct Bar. You could change it to T3 like the following:

class X
{
public:
    template<typename T1, typename T2>
    struct Bar
    {
    public:
        template<typename T3> void bar(T3 const& t3); // Could define it here {}
    };
}; // <-- Missing closing brace

template <typename T1, typename T2>
template <typename T3>
void X::Bar<T1, T2>::bar(T3 const& t3){} // Assuming `T3 const& t3` otherwise...

Or

template <typename T1, typename T2>
template <typename T3>
void X::Bar<T1, T2>::bar(T2 const& t2){}

Then call it like so:

X::Bar<int, int> b;
b.bar(1);

or

X::Bar<int, int> b;
b.bar<int>(1);
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As with any template, you need to include the definition in any translation unit which might implicitly instantiate it, so you should put it in the header file rather than in the .cpp file. If you want to include the definition of the function out-of-line, here's how to write it:

template<typename T1, typename T2> template<typename T3>
void X::Bar<T1, T2>::bar(T2 const &t2) {
  // ...
}

Also of note is that your class definition is ill-formed, because you shadow the outer template's parameter T1 with the inner template's parameter T1. You need to rename one of them.

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Is this what you had in mind?

class X
{
public:
    template<typename T1, typename T2>
    struct Bar
    {
    public:
        void bar(T2 const& t2);
    };
};


template <typename T1, typename T2> void X::Bar<T1, T2>::bar( T2 const & t2 )
{


}

Note that I removed the template<typename T1> off of void bar since that qualification is already part of template<typename T1, typename T2> struct Bar.

Edit: If you really need a third type to qualify bar, then consider this example:

class X
{
public:
    template<typename T1, typename T2>
    struct Bar
    {
    public:
        template <typename T3>
        void bar(T1 const &t1, T2 const &t2, T3 const &t3);
    };
};


template <typename T1, typename T2>
template <typename T3>
void X::Bar<T1, T2>::bar( T1 const &t1, T2 const &t2, T3 const &t3 )
{


}
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no template<typename T1> void bar(T2 const& t2); –  Ehsan Rashid Jul 8 '13 at 7:02
    
That typename shadows the outer T1. If they are the same type there is no need to re-declare. If you really need three distinct types, see the edit I'm about to add. –  Joe Z Jul 8 '13 at 7:07
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