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I want to make the following representation of a graph (edges go from n1 to n2) symmetric, meaning that I want to duplicate each line of the DataFrame with the nodes swapped.

Data preparation (actually, I import this from a spreadsheet with fixed structure):

import pandas as pd
df = pd.DataFrame({'n1':[1,1,2], 
                   'n2':[2,3,4], 
                   'L':[10,20,40], 
                   'D':[5,6,7]})
df = df.set_index(['n1','n2'])

Before:

       D   L
n1 n2
1  2   5  10
   3   6  20
2  4   7  40

After:

       D   L
n1 n2
1  2   5  10
   3   6  20
2  4   7  40
   1   5  10
3  1   6  20
4  2   7  40
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A simple way would be to copy the df and reverse the index yourself, and then append both together.

df2 = df1
df2.index.names = ['n2','n1']
df2 = df2.reorder_levels(['n1','n2'])

df1.append(df2)

       D   L
n2 n1       
1  2   5  10
   3   6  20
2  4   7  40
   1   5  10
3  1   6  20
4  2   7  40
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Exactly what I needed, thanks. Is there a difference between df2=df1 and df2=df1.copy()? –  ojdo Jul 8 '13 at 8:03
1  
In the first case, df2 and df1 are two identical object. In the second case they are different. You can check it by checking id(df) and id(df2) –  waitingkuo Jul 8 '13 at 8:10
    
In that case, it seems I need the copy() to prevent the original index labels from being modified. I want the result to have (n1, n2) index, not (n2, n1). I suggested an edit. –  ojdo Jul 8 '13 at 8:48
    
copy() doesnt prevent that. Using copy seems to only apply on the data, not the index. Which is a bit strange, reading your spreadsheet twice might be the best option, altough not terribly efficient. –  Rutger Kassies Jul 8 '13 at 10:30
    
Strange, I thought it had worked. In that case, df2.append(df1), followed by a sort() does the job. –  ojdo Jul 8 '13 at 11:06

Not an answer, but to illustrate the above discussion a bit:

df1:

print df1

       D   L
n1 n2       
1  2   5  10
   3   6  20
2  4   7  40

df2 = df1.copy()

# these have the same result:
# df2 = pd.DataFrame(df1)
# df2 = copy.copy(df1)

df2.index.names = ['n2','n1']
df2.columns =['X','Y']
df2 = df2 * 3

df2:

print df2

        X    Y
n2 n1         
1  2   15   30
   3   18   60
2  4   21  120

df1:

print df1

       D   L
n2 n1       
1  2   5  10
   3   6  20
2  4   7  40
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