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I need to populate a list with a few 1's in random places. I can successfully create a list of random numbers with:

from random import randint
l = [randint(0,1023) for _ in range(0,10)]

How do I populate a list with 1's in the position specified by l?

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What are you using to implement the sparse list in the first place? There is no default sparse list type in Python. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 8 '13 at 9:08
    
How do you plan to use the information? Depending on your problem, you might be better off working with l (or set(l)) directly. –  Marcelo Cantos Jul 8 '13 at 9:10
    
I need to create a large list of 0's with 10 - 40 l's in random places to benchmark an algorithm –  Tom Kealy Jul 8 '13 at 9:12
    
You cannot guarantee generating 10 - 40 random places using this approach. See "Flaw in both of the above approaches" in my answer. –  Johnsyweb Jul 8 '13 at 18:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A Sparse List

My understanding of "sparse list" is that most (say, more than 95% of) values will be zero and for reasons of memory efficiency you don't wish to store these (cf. Sparse array).

List comprehension

Using your list comprehension, you can use Conditional Expression Resolution (foo if condition else bar) to determine whether a one or a zero is at that position. For example:

In [1]: from random import randint

In [2]: l = [randint(0,1023) for _ in range(0,10)]

In [3]: l
Out[3]: [987, 356, 995, 192, 21, 22, 1013, 375, 796, 339]

In [4]: 1 if 987 in l else 0
Out[4]: 1

In [5]: 1 if 988 in l else 0
Out[5]: 0

This means that you don't need to populate the second list you mention in your question, you could just iterate over the range 0 - 1023 and use:

1 if index in l else 0

Dictionary comprehension

Alternatively, you could use a dictionary comprehension. I think this is more readable:

In [1]: from random import randint
In [2]: l = {randint(0, 1023): 1 for _ in xrange(0, 10)}

This will generate a dictionary like this:

In [3]: l
Out[3]: 
{216: 1,
 381: 1,
 384: 1,
 392: 1,
 396: 1,
 472: 1,
 585: 1,
 630: 1,
 784: 1,
 816: 1}

Then you access the elements, specifying a default value of zero. If the value at the requested position is set, you'll get your one:

In [4]: l.get(216, 0)
Out[4]: 1

If the value is not set, you'll get a zero:

In [5]: l.get(217, 0)
Out[5]: 0

To obtain a list of the positions:

In [6]: l.keys()
Out[6]: [384, 392, 472, 630, 216, 585, 396, 381, 784, 816]

Flaw in both of the above approaches

randint(0, 1023) could emit the same number more than once, leading to clashes, which would result in fewer than the required number of ones.

Tying it all together

I would wrap the dictionary-based implementation in a class to make it easy to (re-)use.

from random import randint


class RandomSparseList(object):
    def __init__(self, size, min_bits, max_bits):
        self.size = int(size)
        self.bits = {}
        self.bits_set = randint(min_bits, max_bits)
        while self.bits_set > len(self.bits):
            self.bits[randint(0, self.size)] = 1 

    def __len__(self):
        return self.size

    def __getitem__(self, index):
        if index < 0 or index >= self.size:
            raise IndexError
        return self.bits.get(int(index), 0)

    def __iter__(self):
        for i in xrange(self.size):
            yield self.__getitem__(i)

    def __contains__(self, index):
        return index in self.bits

    def __repr__(self):
        return '[{}]'.format(', '.join(str(x) for x in self))

    def set_bits(self):
        return self.bits.keys()

Example usage

I've put this class in a file:

In [1]: from random_sparse_list import RandomSparseList

Create an instance:

In [2]: rsl = RandomSparseList(1024, 10, 40)

Check the length of the list:

In [3]: len(rsl)
Out[3]: 1024

Which bits are set?

In [4]: rsl.set_bits()
Out[4]: 
[523,
 400,
 285,
 158,
 419,
 434,
 701,
 67,
 843,
 846,
 591,
 720,
 470,
 864,
 912,
 739,
 996,
 485,
 489,
 234,
 1005,
 573,
 381,
 784]

24: That's certainly in the range of 10-40.

Random-access:

In [5]: rsl[523]
Out[5]: 1

In [6]: rsl[524]
Out[6]: 0

Is a bit set?

In [7]: 400 in rsl
Out[7]: True

In [8]: 401 in rsl
Out[8]: False

Iteration over the list:

In [9]: for index, value in enumerate(rsl):
   ...:     if value:
   ...:         print '{} found at index {}'.format(value, index)
   ...:         
1 found at index 67
1 found at index 158
1 found at index 234
1 found at index 285
1 found at index 381
1 found at index 400
1 found at index 419
1 found at index 434
1 found at index 470
1 found at index 485
1 found at index 489
1 found at index 523
1 found at index 573
1 found at index 591
1 found at index 701
1 found at index 720
1 found at index 739
1 found at index 784
1 found at index 843
1 found at index 846
1 found at index 864
1 found at index 912
1 found at index 996
1 found at index 1005

String representation:

In [10]: rsl
Out[10]: [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]

Note

A set-based implementation would be even more memory efficient but the dict above can be easily changed to contain (random or otherwise) values other than 0 and 1.

Update

Inspired by this question and the lack of a standard sparse list implementation, I've added a sparse_list implementation to the Cheese Shop. You can install it with pip install sparse_list and then the RandomSparseList implementation is much simpler for you:

from sparse_list import SparseList
from random import randint


class RandomSparseList(SparseList):
    def __init__(self, size, min_bits, max_bits):
        super(RandomSparseList, self).__init__(size, 0)
        self.bits = randint(min_bits, max_bits)
        while self.bits > len(self.elements):
            self.elements[randint(0, self.size)] = 1

This will work exactly as in the examples above but with a few extras such as extended slicing. You can read (and contribute to) the source on GitHub.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think I worded my question quite right: I want to populate the positions of another list with 1's - but those positions are generated by my 'l' above. I need to keep track of the positions to benchmark an algorithm. I can't see how your solution does this I'm sorry. –  Tom Kealy Jul 8 '13 at 10:36
1  
+1 For insightful, well formatted and useful answer. –  JS. Jul 8 '13 at 18:18
1  
Thanks for this! It's amazing - I've learned so much! –  Tom Kealy Jul 9 '13 at 9:59

I need to create a large list of 0's with 10 - 40 l's in random places to benchmark an algorithm.

Might this work for you?

import random

zeros = [0] * 1024
ones = [1] * random.randint(10, 40)
l =  zeros + ones
random.shuffle(l)

# the list l contains many zeros and 10 - 40 1's in random places.

where_the_ones_are = [i for i, x in enumerate(l) if x == 1] 
share|improve this answer
    
No, I need to know the positions of the 1's: the point of the algorithm is to find them - that's why I generated a list of random positions initially. Thanks for the help though. –  Tom Kealy Jul 8 '13 at 9:32
1  
@Johnsyweb I'm rusty on algebra and definitions. By "sparse" I mean the most of items are 0. Here we have a large list of zeros with 10 to 40 ones. Can't it be considered sparse? –  Paolo Jul 8 '13 at 10:20
1  
For my purposes (mathematical), as long as <10% of the list is a 1, the list is sparse. –  Tom Kealy Jul 8 '13 at 12:06
1  
Apologies. What I should have said is that this is a "naive implementation" of a "sparse" list. The memory required to store 1,024 zeros is not great, but if you wanted a list of 10^100 elements with only 10-40 ones among them, then this would be a huge waste. This is what my answer addresses. –  Johnsyweb Jul 8 '13 at 17:55
1  
Johnsyweb's answer deserves much more attention than mine, @TomKealy glad you changed your mind and accepted his answer, I learnt a lot too :-) –  Paolo Jul 9 '13 at 10:00

You can use this snippet:

ones_lst = [SOME_VALUE] * 1024
for val in l:
  ones_lst[val] = 1

Here replace SOME_VALUE to the different value you use except one (maybe zero)

share|improve this answer

This is my solution. The postions and the number of 1s are both random. You'll have the positions in ones array to check if your algorithm works.

from random import randint

MAX_NUMS=1000
#big array of 0s
arr = [0] * MAX_NUMS

#How many 1s do you want?
numOnes=randint(10, 40)
ones=[1]*numOnes

#Fill array with random postions 
for i in range(0,numOnes-1):
        ones[i] =  randint(0,MAX_NUMS-1)
print ones

#Set arr to 1 for each random postion
for pos in ones:
        arr[pos]=1
print arr
share|improve this answer

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