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I am stuck with a regular expression in SQL server 2005+, i.e. I need a regular expression to validate a first name (which allows only alphabets,whitespaces and a .(dot)).

I tried with below query

SELECT PATINDEX('%[A-Z]%[a-z]%[.]%','John H. Wilson') as VALIDFIRSTNAME

But, this also fails in some cases. I'm unable to find a clear regular expression. Any assistance would be very much appreciated.

I have used patindex to recognise the given pattern. If the string doesn't match the pattern, then It should give 0 else it should give 1 or >1.

Thanks in advance.

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SQL Server still doesn't have RegEx support unless you go down the CLR route. I'm unclear from your example what you're actually trying to allow - maybe if you could add some more examples of valid and invalid names we could glean more meaning from them. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 8 '13 at 9:55
    
(to those who answer , does sql2012 supports full regex ?) –  Royi Namir Jul 8 '13 at 9:55
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever : I have used patindex to recognise the given pattern. If the string doesn't match the pattern, then It should give 0 else it should give 1 or >1 –  Pavan Kumar Jul 8 '13 at 12:18
    
@pavan6e - I know what PATINDEX does. What I don't understand is what you're trying to do. You've given one example, and you've not even said if it's meant to match or not. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 8 '13 at 12:31
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can't match mentioned condition with available patterns.
Try to follow this way.

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I have used patindex to recognise the given pattern. If the string doesn't match the pattern, then It should give 0 else it should give 1 or >1 –  Pavan Kumar Jul 8 '13 at 12:19
    
SELECT PATINDEX('%[A-Z]%[a-z]%[.]%','1J^oh!2n _-H.3 (W)il4son') as VALIDFIRSTNAME –  revoua Jul 8 '13 at 12:49
    
I mean that wildcard '%'allows any string of zero or more characters and because you use it - you cannot avoid non-valid characters as you described. –  revoua Jul 11 '13 at 11:39
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