Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can we reverse a simple string in Go? A Perl-like 'reverse' function does not seem to exist there.

share|improve this question
    
So many identical answers... –  dystroy Sep 5 at 7:22
    
As far as I understand, the solutions given below don't work with precomposed or combining characters, like giving a+´ instead of á. I wonder how that could be taken into account, without normalizing it. –  siritinga Sep 5 at 7:55

14 Answers 14

In Go1 rune is a builtin type.

func Reverse(s string) string {
    runes := []rune(s)
    for i, j := 0, len(runes)-1; i < j; i, j = i+1, j-1 {
        runes[i], runes[j] = runes[j], runes[i]
    }
    return string(runes)
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Does this work with combining characters? –  rightfold Nov 26 '13 at 19:08
    
you cannot use len() in Go to find out the length of a string/Array/Slice etc... Here's why? - len() in Go means the size of the input in bytes. It does not correspond to its length. - Not all utf8's runes are of the same size. It can be either 1, 2, 4, or 8. - You should use unicode/ut8 package's method RuneCountInString to get the length of the rune. –  Anvesh Checka May 25 at 15:17

Russ Cox, on the golang-nuts mailing list, suggests

package main 
import "fmt"
func main() { 
        input := "The quick brown 狐 jumped over the lazy 犬" 
        // Get Unicode code points. 
        n := 0
        rune := make([]rune, len(input))
        for _, r := range input { 
                rune[n] = r
                n++
        } 
        rune = rune[0:n]
        // Reverse 
        for i := 0; i < n/2; i++ { 
                rune[i], rune[n-1-i] = rune[n-1-i], rune[i] 
        } 
        // Convert back to UTF-8. 
        output := string(rune)
        fmt.Println(output)
}
share|improve this answer
12  
I like how they force you to think about encodings. –  György Andrasek Nov 18 '09 at 9:46
3  
off-topic: why is it [golang-nuts] and not [go-nuts]? –  Jimmy Mar 19 '10 at 16:29
    
Wow, wtf is up with the double assignment when reversing? Interesting. Now, think about a string with an uneven number of runes. The middle one gets special treatment, with the correct end-result after all though. :) An interesting little optimization I wouldn’t have thought of right away. –  Kissaki Jul 15 '12 at 21:36
    
I don't understand why this conversion to rune, why not rune:=[]rune(input)? –  siritinga Sep 5 at 7:31

This works on unicode strings by considering 2 things:

  • range works on string by enumerating unicode characters
  • string can be constructed from int slices where each element is a unicode character.

So here it goes:

func reverse(s string) string {
    o := make([]int, utf8.RuneCountInString(s));
    i := len(o);
    for _, c := range s {
    	i--;
    	o[i] = c;
    }
    return string(o);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would assign i:=len(o)-1 and then fold the for into a single line for _, c:=range s { o[i--]=c; }. Man I HATE the for without parentheses - is this allowed: for(_, c:=range s) { o[i--]=c; } –  Lawrence Dol Nov 19 '09 at 19:43
    
Could you explain what the _ does? –  Lawrence Dol Nov 19 '09 at 19:44
3  
@Software_Monkey: o[i--] = c is not allowed in Go. -- and ++ are statements, not expressions. _ means to discard (ignore) that variable. –  yuku Nov 25 '09 at 7:10
    
with go 1.1+ it returns error in string([]int) line, if instead []rune type is used for o, all works –  Otuken Aug 11 '13 at 3:37

I noticed this question when Simon posted his solution which, since strings are immutable, is very inefficient. The other proposed solutions are also flawed; they don't work or they are inefficient.

Here's an efficient solution that works, except when the string is not valid UTF-8 or the string contains combining characters.

package main

import "fmt"

func Reverse(s string) string {
    n := len(s)
    runes := make([]rune, n)
    for _, rune := range s {
        n--
        runes[n] = rune
    }
    return string(runes[n:])
}

func main() {
    fmt.Println(Reverse(Reverse("Hello, 世界")))
    fmt.Println(Reverse(Reverse("The quick brown 狐 jumped over the lazy 犬")))
}
share|improve this answer
    
return string(runes) Works as well. –  Tommy Jan 6 '13 at 21:53
    
@Tommy: No, return string(runes) does not work for all cases. –  peterSO Aug 19 '13 at 20:01
    
could you please explain a bit more on why that is? I made a short program and it works there, but maybe those cases you talk about aren't triggered there? play.golang.org/p/yk1sAwFjol –  Tommy Aug 20 '13 at 9:52
    
@Tommy: Your short program merely demonstrates that the NUL character is a NOP when sent to a printer or terminal. Your Reverse2 function fails for non-ASCII UTF-8 encoded strings. I've revised your short program so that it's a valid test: play.golang.org/p/Ic5G5QEO93 –  peterSO Aug 21 '13 at 2:19

Building on Stephan202's original suggestion, and appears to work for unicode strings:

import "strings";

func Reverse( orig string ) string {
    var c []string = strings.Split( orig, "", 0 );

    for i, j := 0, len(c)-1; i < j; i, j = i+1, j-1 {
        c[i], c[j] = c[j], c[i]
    }

    return strings.Join( c, "" );
}

Alternate, not using strings package, but not 'unicode-safe':

func Reverse( s string ) string {
    b := make([]byte, len(s));
    var j int = len(s) - 1;
    for i := 0; i <= j; i++ {
        b[j-i] = s[i]
    }

    return string ( b );
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. That works. But I must say that it is rather odd (for now) that splitting and joining is necessary for such a simple task... –  Stephan202 Nov 17 '09 at 23:32
    
@martin: sorry for that edit. I accidentally pasted my updated answer in your question... me very ashamed. –  Stephan202 Nov 17 '09 at 23:53
    
I attempted a rollback. Hope I got it right. –  Nosredna Nov 17 '09 at 23:56
    
@Stephan - no problem. I added an alternate solution, based on the strings package Bytes function. –  martin clayton Nov 17 '09 at 23:59
    
@Nosradena: I rolled back within the same minute (I was surprised to see that Martin updated his answer with exactly the same text I had just written... and then it dawned on me ;) –  Stephan202 Nov 18 '09 at 0:00

Looks a bit 'roundabout', and probably not very efficient, but illustrates how the Reader interface can be used to read from strings. IntVectors also seem very suitable as buffers when working with utf8 strings.

It would be even shorter when leaving out the 'size' part, and insertion into the vector by Insert, but I guess that would be less efficient, as the whole vector then needs to be pushed back by one each time a new rune is added.

This solution definitely works with utf8 characters.

package main

import "container/vector";
import "fmt";
import "utf8";
import "bytes";
import "bufio";


func
main() {
    toReverse := "Smørrebrød";
    fmt.Println(toReverse);
    fmt.Println(reverse(toReverse));
}

func
reverse(str string) string {
    size := utf8.RuneCountInString(str);
    output := vector.NewIntVector(size);
    input := bufio.NewReader(bytes.NewBufferString(str));
    for i := 1; i <= size; i++ {
    	rune, _, _ := input.ReadRune();
    	output.Set(size - i, rune);
    }
    return string(output.Data());
}
share|improve this answer

This works, without all the mucking about with functions:

func Reverse(s string) (result string) {
  for _,v := range s {
    result = string(v) + result
  }
  return 
}
share|improve this answer
1  
While it works, since strings are immutable, it's very inefficient. I've posted a more efficient solution. –  peterSO Feb 11 '11 at 7:16
    
This is much too easy to understand. Make it harder :-) (and, "plus one" for just getting on with it) –  Roboprog Apr 13 '13 at 1:33

I have not been able to find a built-in function for that (yet). However, there is a reverse example in effective go:

// Reverse a
for i, j := 0, len(a)-1; i < j; i, j = i+1, j-1 {
    a[i], a[j] = a[j], a[i]
}

This will not work if a is of type string, however, since in Go strings are immutable. Martin Clayton solves this by splitting and joining a given string. The following is an alternative solution, which unfortunately only works for ascii strings:

import "strings"

func Reverse(input string) string {
  b := strings.Bytes(input);
  for i, j := 0, len(b)-1; i < j; i, j = i+1, j-1 {
    b[i], b[j] = b[j], b[i]
  }
  return string(b);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Is there a way that doesn't hurt my brain? –  Alvin Row Nov 17 '09 at 23:12
    
It's worse. Strings are immutable, so the above code does not work for strings. I'll delete it for now. –  Stephan202 Nov 17 '09 at 23:25
    
Now undeleted with a working version. –  Stephan202 Nov 17 '09 at 23:51
5  
I suspect that this will fail spectacularly on anything other than ASCII characters. –  Robert P Nov 18 '09 at 0:10
    
@Robert: just tried; indeed it does ;) –  Stephan202 Nov 18 '09 at 0:12

A version which I think works on unicode. It is built on the utf8.Rune functions:

func Reverse(s string) string {
    b := make([]byte, len(s));
    for i, j := len(s)-1, 0; i >= 0; i-- {
        if utf8.RuneStart(s[i]) {
            rune, size := utf8.DecodeRuneInString(s[i:len(s)]);
            utf8.EncodeRune(rune, b[j:j+size]);
            j += size;
        }
    }
    return string(b);
}
share|improve this answer

rune is a type, so use it. Moreover, Go doesn't use semicolons.

func reverse(s string) string {
    l := len(s)
    m := make([]rune, l)

    for _, c := range s {
        l--
        m[l] = c
    }
    return string(m)
}

func main() {
    str := "the quick brown 狐 jumped over the lazy 犬"
    fmt.Printf("reverse(%s): [%s]\n", str, reverse(str))
}
share|improve this answer

This is the fastest implementation

func Reverse(s string) string {
    size := len(s)
    buf := make([]byte, size)
    for start := 0; start < size; {
        r, n := utf8.DecodeRuneInString(s[start:])
        start += n
        utf8.EncodeRune(buf[size-start:], r)
    }
    return string(buf)
}

const (
    s       = "The quick brown 狐 jumped over the lazy 犬"
    reverse = "犬 yzal eht revo depmuj 狐 nworb kciuq ehT"
)

func TestReverse(t *testing.T) {
    if Reverse(s) != reverse {
        t.Error(s)
    }
}

func BenchmarkReverse(b *testing.B) {
    for i := 0; i < b.N; i++ {
        Reverse(s)
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Did you benchmark the solutions before claiming it's the fastest implementation ? –  dystroy Sep 5 at 7:25

Here is yet another solution:

func ReverseStr(s string) string {
    chars := []rune(s)
    rev := make([]rune, 0, len(chars))
    for i := len(chars) - 1; i >= 0; i-- {
        rev = append(rev, chars[i])
    }
    return string(rev)
}

However, yazu's solution above is more elegant since he reverses the []rune slice in place.

share|improve this answer

Yet Another Solution (tm) :

package main 
import "fmt"

type Runes []rune

func (s Runes) Reverse() (cp Runes) {
    l := len(s); cp = make(Runes, l)
    // i <= 1/2 otherwise it will mess up with odd length strings
    for i := 0; i <= l/2; i++ { 
        cp[i], cp[l-1-i] = s[l-1-i], s[i] 
    }
    return cp
}

func (s Runes) String() string {
    return string(s)
}

func main() { 
    input := "The quick brown 狐 jumped over the lazy 犬 +odd" 
    r := Runes(input)
    output := r.Reverse()
    valid := string(output.Reverse()) == input
    fmt.Println(len(r), len(output), r, output.Reverse(), valid)
}
share|improve this answer

Another short solution

func Reverse(s string) string{
    arr := []byte(s)
    length := len(s) - 1
    for i := length; i > -1; i--{
        arr[length - i] = s[i]
    }
    return string(arr)
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Doesn't work -- it reverses bytes, but strings are composed of possibly multi-byte runes. This will break unicode. –  Baron Schwartz Sep 20 '13 at 17:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.