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I'm trying to build on assembly 8086 a tic tac toe game against the computer, but whenever I run it, the TD gets stuck on this specific command:

mov dx, 0

this command is in a function (third line):

reboard proc
        mov al, 0
        mov bx, 0
        mov dx, 0
        mov cx, bp
        rowdata:
            cmp arr[bx], 'X'
            je rowX
            cmp arr[bx], 'y'
            je rowY
            jmp rowQm
            rowX:
                add al, 100
                jmp rowQm
            rowY:
                add al, 1
            rowQm:
                inc bx
        loop rowdata

        mov cx, bp
        add si, dx
        mov arr[si + 3], al
        sub si, dx
        mov al, 0
        inc dx
        cmp dx, bp
        jnz rowdata

        mov dx, 0
        mov bx, dx
        coldata:
            cmp arr[bx], 'X'
            je colX
            cmp arr[bx], 'Y'
            je colY
            jmp colQm
            colX:
                add al, 100
                jmp colQm
            colY:
                add al, 1
            colQm:
                add bx, bp
                loop coldata
        add si, bp
        add si, dx
        mov arr[si + 3], al
        sub si , dx
        sub si, bp
        inc dx
        mov bx, dx
        mov al, 0
        mov cx, bp
        dec cx
        cmp dx, bp
        jnz coldata
        ret
    reboard endp

In audition, the two first commands in the function are applied, but don't do any change in the registers.

This isn't the first time this problem happened to me, it also happened in another function (in the same program), and similarly - the first two commands in the function did not work. the command was:

mov dl, 13

I was trying to move the cursor a line down.

I also ran this specific function on a new program and it worked perfectly from beginning to end, I am clueless, anyway this is the new program I tried:

note: the value of 'X' is 88, and the value of 'Y' is 89.

dseg segment arr db 63, 63, 89, 88, 89, 63, 63, 88, 89 dseg ends cseg segment assume cs:cseg, ds:dseg a proc mov al, 0 mov bx, 0 mov dx, 0 mov cx, bp rowdata: cmp arr[bx], 'X' je rowX cmp arr[bx], 'Y' je rowY jmp rowQm rowX: add al, 100 jmp rowQm rowY: add al, 1 rowQm: inc bx loop rowdata

    mov cx, bp
    add si, dx
    mov arr[si + 3], al
    sub si, dx
    mov al, 0
    inc dx
    cmp dx, bp
    jnz rowdata

    mov dx, 0
    mov bx, dx
    coldata:
        cmp arr[bx], 'X'
        je colX
        cmp arr[bx], 'Y'
        je colY
        jmp colQm
        colX:
            add al, 100
            jmp colQm
        colY:
            add al, 1
        colQm:
            add bx, bp
            loop coldata
    add si, bp
    add si, dx
    mov arr[si + 3], al
    sub si , dx
    sub si, bp
    inc dx
    mov bx, dx
    mov al, 0
    mov cx, bp
    cmp dx, bp
    jnz coldata
    ret
a endp
Begin:
    mov ax, dseg
    mov ds, ax
    mov bp, 3
    mov si, 9
    call a
    int 3h

cseg ends end begin

any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
Maybe inc dx overflows and sets a flag so cmp dx, bp always jump that is making mov dx,0 unreachable. –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 8 '13 at 11:00
2  
What exactly do you mean by "gets stuck?" –  Ferruccio Jul 8 '13 at 11:04
    
Could it be that you are writing to the code segment? I don't really know what you mean by "gets stuck", so I'm just guessing. Still, if you debug not in the sourcecode, but in memory,you should see if the instruction has changed. –  Devolus Jul 8 '13 at 13:16
    
At a glance, a few things don't seem right. Why is the base pointer register bp used as a counter? bp is usually an address that points into the stack. Also dx appears always to be zero by the time you do a mov si,dx or add si,dx since it's set to zero on the 4th line in your sample and isn't changed in between. –  lurker Jul 8 '13 at 14:35
1  
In older, pure assembly, with only register passing conventions I used to see bp used as a general purpose register sometimes. A dangerous thing to do generally, but it can work in certain circumstances. –  Brian Knoblauch Jul 8 '13 at 15:35

1 Answer 1

I figured it out:

the reason the TD gets frozen is that the location where I called the function was to far away from the function itself.

I simply copied the function to a closer location (in the code) to the place I call it an It worked. That is also the reason the function worked perfectly from beginning to end when I ran it on a new program, in the other program there wasn't so much space different between the function and the place I called the function.

share|improve this answer
    
It's pretty unlikely that that was the real problem. More likely that in changing the program you also somehow fixed your build so that the symbol info file matched the source and the executable. –  Jim Mischel Jul 10 '13 at 14:23

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