Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here i have written a code which inserts numbers in Binary tree. But it gives segmentation fault error. And also it says " note: expected ‘struct tree *’ but argument is of type ‘struct node *’" in line 8. Here is the code :-

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
struct tree{
  int data;
  struct tree *left;
  struct tree *right;
};

struct tree* insert(struct tree* node, int data)
{
  if(!node){
    node=malloc(sizeof(struct tree));
    node->data=data;
    node->left=node->right=NULL;
    return node;
  }
  else {
    if(data>node->data){
     node->right= insert(node->right,data);
     return node;
    }
    else{
     node->left= insert(node->left,data);
    }  
 return node;
  }
}
printtree(struct tree* node)
{
  if(node){
      printf("%d",node->data);
  }
      printtree(node->left);
      printtree(node->right);

} 
main()
{
 int i,n;
 struct tree *NODE;
 NODE= insert(NODE,5);
 NODE= insert(NODE,3);
 NODE= insert(NODE,8);
 printtree(NODE);
}
share|improve this question
1  
Where is struct node defined? –  Kninnug Jul 8 '13 at 11:14
    
Try compiling with warnings for a start to see what's gone wrong that you can fix straightaway. –  Nobilis Jul 8 '13 at 11:15
3  
Too many errors. As Brett Hale points out, struct tree *node is not initialised, struct tree *treenode is not used anywhere, and I also believe that in the structure definition,both struct node should be struct tree –  Binayaka Chakraborty Jul 8 '13 at 11:21
    
Now that you've edited your question to include a supplied answer, no one has any idea what the question was, or why you were getting an error. The right thing to do is accept the answer that supplied this code. –  Brett Hale Jul 8 '13 at 12:58

3 Answers 3

You use if( node ) but better to use if( node != NULL )

You use if( !node ) but better to use if( node == NULL )

It make code more readable.

You have so many mistakes - so ... I make it in my way (my code formating, etc.).

printtree(node->left); printtree(node->right); was outside if( node != NULL ){} so it try to get NULL->left and NULL->right

Tested - code works.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

struct tree{
  int data;
  struct tree *left;
  struct tree *right;
};

struct tree* insert(struct tree* node, int data)
{
    if( node == NULL ) {
        node = malloc( sizeof(struct tree) );
        node->data = data;
        node->left = node->right = NULL;
    } else {
        if( data > node->data ){
            node->right = insert(node->right, data);
        } else {
            node->left = insert(node->left, data);
        }  
    }

    return node;
}

void printtree(struct tree* node)
{
    if( node != NULL ){
        printf("%d\n", node->data);
        printtree(node->left);
        printtree(node->right);
    }   
} 

int main()
{
    struct tree *NODE = NULL;

    NODE = insert(NODE, 5);
    NODE = insert(NODE, 3);
    NODE = insert(NODE, 8);

    printtree(NODE);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
yes it works now. Thanku by the way . There was problem with if statement but now it is fine ! :) And the way i was stating the if conditions "if( node )" works as well –  user2456752 Jul 8 '13 at 12:01
    
if(node) works fine - it can be only less readable for others (for beginners, for teachers testing your knowlege ;) ) You can always mark my answer as accepted. –  furas Jul 8 '13 at 12:17
    
+1 This is a neat example. @user2456752 - if (value) really should only be used for integer T/F (not 0/0) tests. It's not good practice for NULL pointers, even if it is legal, and it makes code with heavy use of pointers harder to read. –  Brett Hale Jul 8 '13 at 12:26
    
@user2456752 Brett Hale is right pointers are hard to read especially pointers to pointers so learn to adding comments in code too :) –  furas Jul 8 '13 at 12:48
    
thanku i'll keep it in mind :) –  user2456752 Jul 8 '13 at 14:16

The local variable: struct tree* node; is not initialized, so the if (!node) test will have undefined behavior. Unless you assign it something or use it to hold a malloc'd node, the expression in the else block tries to dereference an uninitialized pointer.


You should also get used to idea that a tree can be considered a 'recursive' structure, so any node is a tree, and the top-level tree is simply a node. There's no good reason for two separate types here.

share|improve this answer
    
i have changed the code but still it is giving segmentation fault.The "node" in place of "tree" was a typo error –  user2456752 Jul 8 '13 at 11:38

You are still making the error of passing NODE by value. If you want to modify it, you must use a pointer to that pointer.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
typedef struct t
{
    int data;
    struct t *left;
    struct t *right;
}tree;

tree* insert(tree **node, int data)
{
    if(!(*node))
    {
        *node=malloc(sizeof(tree));
        (*node)->data=data;
        (*node)->left=(*node)->right=NULL;
        return *node;
    }
    else
    {
        if(data>(*node)->data)
        {
            (*node)->right = insert(&((*node)->right),data);
            return *node;
        }
        else
        {
            (*node)->left = insert(&((*node)->left),data);
            return *node;
        }
    }
}

void printtree(tree *node)
{
    if(node)
    {
        printf("%d",node->data);
        printtree(node->left);
        printtree(node->right);
    }
}

void freeMemory(tree *node)
{
    if(node)
    {
        freeMemory(node->left);
        freeMemory(node->right);
        free(node);
    }
}

int main()
{
    tree *NODE = NULL;
    NODE= insert(&NODE,5);
    NODE= insert(&NODE,3);
    NODE= insert(&NODE,8);
    printtree(NODE);
    freeMemory(NODE);
    return 0;
}

Link: http://ideone.com/OpZWiC

share|improve this answer
    
He return node pointer as result and assign to NODE - he don't need to pointer to pointer. But he should do this with pointer to pointer because it is nicer ;) –  furas Jul 8 '13 at 11:57
    
Comment retracted ^_^, but he really should use pointer to pointer :) –  Binayaka Chakraborty Jul 8 '13 at 12:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.