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I want to restrict access to an internet-facing ASMX web service using self-signed certificates / IIS configuration only. This is the requirement. If it rings any alarm bells, please let me know.

Here's what I've done so far:

  • Created a root certificate - added to Local Computer Trusted Root Authority store on both the web server and client machines. Also imported to IIS Server Certificates.
  • Created a server certificate - added to the Local Computer Personal store on the web server. Also imported to IIS Server Certificates.
  • Created a site with a HTTPS binding on port 443 requiring SSL.
  • Created a client certificate - added to the Local Computer Personal store on the client machine.
  • Attempted to view the site from the client: https:// 123.456.7.8

I'm getting this error: 403 - Forbidden. You do not have permission to view this directory or page using the credentials that you supplied.

I've searched far and wide on this one... Any ideas?

Update 1:

I created the certificates using 'X Certificate and Key Management'.

I used different keys to sign each certificate, but the Client and Server certificates were both signed with the CA certificate.

I'm trying to access the resource (it's a WSDL) using IE, which should look for my client certificate in the Personal store. Ultimately it will be consumed by a .NET client.

Update 2:

Even explicitly setting the client certificate in code for a request to the server failed (with the same error - forbidden).

FWIW, I pulled the plug on this. The additional development cost to implement an application-level solution is less significant than the investigation / troubleshooting involved here. I remain curious, however!

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