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I'm implementing a very light atomic wrapper as a learning exercise for primitive data types in C++ for Windows, and I have a few simple questions about implementing the assignment operator. Consider the two implementations below:

// Simple assignment
Atomic& Atomic::operator=(const Atomic& other)
{
    mValue = other.mValue;
    return *this;
}

// Interlocked assignment
Atomic& Atomic::operator=(const Atomic& other)
{
    _InterlockedExchange(&mValue, other.mValue);
    return *this;
}

Assume that mValue is the correct type and that the Atomic class has it as a member.

  1. Is _InterlockedExchange needed for a thread-safe assignment operator, or is the simple implementation enough to guarantee thread-safety?
  2. If the simple assignment is thread-safe, then is it even needed to implement the assignment operator for this class? The compiler default should suffice, no?
  3. If the simple assignment is thread-safe in Windows, is it also thread-safe in other platforms? Is the equivalent of _InterlockedExchange required to guarantee thread safety on other platforms?
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

if mValue is a primitive type (and at most 32 bits wide on a 32-bit CPU, at most 64 bits wide on a 64-bit CPU), and you're running on an x86 CPU (in 32 or 64 bit mode) and you don't manually misalign data, then memory reads/writes are guaranteed to be atomic.

This does not, in itself, mean that the compiler won't reorder memory accesses or even optimize it out entirely, but the CPU does guarantee that any well-aligned read/write with data of those sizes will be atomic.

However, note that I'm talking about atomicity, not thread safety, because "thread safety" depends on the context in which the code is used.

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In the event that those conditions aren't true, I'd need _InterlockedExchange (or the equivalent on other systems), or is there a more suitable atomic function? –  Zeenobit Jul 8 '13 at 12:30
1  
Only thing more suitable is std::atomic. –  Cory Nelson Jul 8 '13 at 12:36
1  
In the event that those conditions aren't true, then it depends on which conditions are true. _InterlockedExchange isn't magic. It is a wrapper around CPU-specific instructions which are guaranteed to be atomic. If such instructions do not exist, then there is nothing _InterlockedExchange can do about it –  jalf Jul 8 '13 at 12:37

There are three issues that C++ atomic types deal with. First, a thread switch might occur in the middle of a read or write, resulting in garbled data; this is known as "tearing". Second, each processor has its own data cache, and writing a value in one thread doesn't necessarily update the value in another processor's cache; this is "stale data". Third, the compiler can reorder instructions to improve efficiency if the results don't violate various rules; if you don't tell it that data is shared between threads it may do things that surprise you.

Using std::atomic (or the various implementation-specific mechanisms for ensuring atomicity) handles all three problems. There's no good reason to bypass them; the library and compiler writers almost certainly know better than you do how to generate efficient code that works correctly.

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  1. That depends on the size and alignment of mValue, which further depends on how the Atomic object is aligned. Generally, if the size is equal to the size of a CPU register AND properly aligned, then the write is atomic. (Example: A 32-bit data type aligned to a 32-bit boundary on a 32-bit CPU will be written atomically. Atomicity is not guaranteed for a 64-bit data type in this scenario.)
  2. Correct, the compiler-default implementation will be identical to the "simple assignment" example you have given, assuming that mValue is the only instance data member.
  3. Usually, yes, as this is more a function of the CPU and architecture than it is the specific operating system. In cases where a write of mValue would not be atomic, you would need a similar construct. (For example, see the GCC documentation regarding built-in atomic operations.)
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