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Hi I am trying to implement this Common Lisp Macro in Ruby 2.0.0-p247:

(defmacro binary-cmp (a b &key (test-func '>))
  `(funcall #',test-func ,a ,b))

A binary test function that takes 2 arguments and 1 keyword argument test_func, and the test_func defaults to gt proc.

gt    = -> (a, b) { a > b }
lt    = -> (a, b) { a < b }
equal = -> (a, b) { a == b }

def binary_cmp (a, b, test_func: gt)
  test_func.(a, b)
end

But this won't work, because in binary_cmp cannot see the outside: gt .

How should I do to accomplish this? Is it possible? Or there is a common practice to do it? Thank you very much.

EDIT:

The reason why I need keyword argument is that my parameter list has 5 parameters and maybe the user only need the default test function (say lt), or maybe someone wanna use (gt) as default.

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Are you using Ruby 2.0? –  Fred Jul 8 '13 at 13:01
    
Yes Ruby 2.0.0-p247 –  juanitofatas Jul 8 '13 at 13:10

4 Answers 4

This Lisp code is bad style in a few ways:

(defmacro binary-cmp (a b &key (test-func '>))
  `(funcall #',test-func ,a ,b))
  • it shouldn't be a macro. It should be a function.

  • The macro could be written simpler.

The FUNCALL form is not necessary, because it adds no functionality. Since by design the test-func needs to be a function name (FUNCTION or #' expects a function name), we can just remove FUNCALL and #'. In Lisp syntax, the first element of a list is a function name.

(defmacro binary-cmp (a b &key (test-func '>))
  `(,test-func ,a ,b))

As a function it would be just:

(defun binary-predicate (a b &key (predicate '>))
  (funcall predicate a b))
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You don't really need macros to do this. Ruby has a pretty dynamic runtime, so just do it using the message passing semantics that OO design involves and use #send.

def binary_cmp (a, b, test_func = :>)
  a.send(test_func, b)
end

binary_cmp(42, 7, :<) # => false
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This has absolutely nothing to do with functions or keyword arguments or macros. gt is a local variable. Local variables are local to the scope they are defined in, in this case the script body. If you want a global variable, you need to use a global variable:

$gt    = -> (a, b) { a > b }
$lt    = -> (a, b) { a < b }
$equal = -> (a, b) { a == b }

def binary_cmp (a, b, test_func: $gt)
  test_func.(a, b)
end

Alternatively, you can use a nested scope. The only thing in Ruby that creates a nested scope is a block, so you need to use a block:

gt    = -> (a, b) { a > b }
lt    = -> (a, b) { a < b }
equal = -> (a, b) { a == b }

define_method(:binary_cmp) do |a, b, test_func: gt|
  test_func.(a, b)
end
share|improve this answer

You could try something like this:

def binary_cmp(a, b, test_func: ->(a, b){ a > b })
  test_func.(a,b)
end
share|improve this answer

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