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I've got 2 tables. One is called subscriptions and the other is called service_sushi_service. I am trying to get all of the phones which have more than 2 different service_id. for example.

phone: 12345 service id: 12 
phone: 12345 service id: 12 
phone: 12345 service id: 8
phone: 12345 service id: 8
phone: 12345 service id: 13
phone: 22222 service id: 13
phone: 22333 service id: 3

I need to output it as phone=12345, occurences=3

This is what I got so far: and I have no idea how to go further.

SELECT 
    `sub`.`phone` AS `phone`
FROM 
    `subscriptions` AS `sub`
LEFT JOIN `service_sushi_service` `sushi_service` ON `sushi_service`.`sushi_service_id` = `sub`.`sushi_service_id`
WHERE 
    date(`sub`.`added`) >= '2013-01-01'
GROUP BY `sub`.`phone`
share|improve this question
    
Can you please add the table structures? – Mari Jul 8 '13 at 12:58
up vote 4 down vote accepted
SELECT 
    `sub`.`phone` AS `phone`,
    COUNT(`sushi_service`.`sushi_service_id`) as occurences        
FROM 
    `subscriptions` AS `sub`
LEFT JOIN `service_sushi_service` `sushi_service` ON `sushi_service`.`sushi_service_id` = `sub`.`sushi_service_id`
WHERE 
    date(`sub`.`added`) >= '2013-01-01'
GROUP BY `sub`.`phone`
HAVING occurences > 2

EDIT: Should point out that HAVING seems to be a MySQL only kinda thing. Thought I'd post this for your reference - http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/group-by-extensions.html

share|improve this answer
    
Good solution (inner join could be used though) although the having clause needs to be HAVING whatever > 2 – Kickstart Jul 8 '13 at 13:03
    
Yea fair point. – kalpaitch Jul 8 '13 at 13:04
    
at least postgres as of 8.2 and oracle 11gR2 also support the having clause (cf. here(postgres) and here(oracle)). furthermore it's part of the current sql standard. – collapsar Jul 8 '13 at 13:15
    
HAVING is not a mysql-only kinda thing. It's part of the SQL 92 standard (see more on wiki) – Aleks G Jul 8 '13 at 13:17
    
Cool, correction indeed. – kalpaitch Jul 8 '13 at 13:26

Two things I see with this code:

  1. Why are you doing LEFT JOIN? I'd say you need a straight INNER JOIN.

  2. You can use count(distinct field_name) to get the corresponding value.

Hence the SQL can look like this:

SELECT 
    `sub`.`phone` AS `phone`,
     count(distinct `sushi_service`.`sushi_service_id`) as `occurrences`
FROM 
    `subscriptions` AS `sub`
JOIN `service_sushi_service` `sushi_service` ON `sushi_service`.`sushi_service_id` = `sub`.`sushi_service_id`
WHERE 
    date(`sub`.`added`) >= '2013-01-01'
GROUP BY `sub`.`phone`
HAVING `occurrences` > 2
share|improve this answer
    
count(distinct field_name) love this – Mari Jul 8 '13 at 13:08

No need for joins at all

select s1.phone, count(s1.*) from 
    (select unique phone, sushi_service_id from subscriptions) s1
group by s1.phone having count(s1.*) > 2
share|improve this answer
    
a join is much more efficient than a subselect – Aleks G Jul 8 '13 at 13:20
    
no solution without a join will work unless subscription info from the subscriber table is replicated in service_sushi_service, the latter being not advisable since such a db schema is not normalized. you may substitute subselects for an explicit join but effectively you're just imitating the join operator for your query. – collapsar Jul 8 '13 at 13:57

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