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I want to use a pixel font on the web. I'm including it using @font-face however all the browsers are applying anti-aliasing to the font. I can't seem to find a CSS rule to disable this, can anyone think of another method of disabling anti-aliasing?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Font rendering is done by the operating system and browser, so, as of yet, I believe there is little that you can do with CSS. There may be some proposed CSS rules in discussion (I've seen mention "font-smooth" or something like that), but nothing in CSS3, as far as I know, and definitely nothing in CSS2.

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Thanks, pretty much what I figured. –  Samuel Nov 18 '09 at 4:45

I don't think css has an option for anti-aliasing. Try cufon instead: http://wiki.github.com/sorccu/cufon/about

It's pretty easy to use and it will render your pixel fonts very well. You might also be interested in Shaun Inman's Pxfon: http://shauninman.com/archive/2009/04/17/pxr%5Fcufon%5Fpxfon

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This does render nicely, but the text highlighting is horrible, and it becomes very obvious that it is not a normal font. See an example of it here: pixel-portraits.com/pxfon –  Trevor Hickey Mar 13 at 22:18

Most of pixel fonts just won't work properly if you are using them on a 8pt multiple size (8, 16, 24, etc.)

If you work on wrong font-sizes you will end up getting aliased/foggy characters.

Check this out...

http://www.fontsquirrel.com/fonts/list/style/Pixel

... it may help ;)

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Even with the correct font size it still aliases the font :( –  Samuel Feb 2 '11 at 4:19

This question is old, so just wanted to give an update.

Based on caniuse.com, there's a CSS property for it but has been removed from the CSS3 specification drafts. So it is not a standard solution. Some Webkit, Firefox & Opera browsers support it but it is inconsistent. It mostly works for desktop and Mac OS users

-webkit-font-smoothing: none || antialiased || subpixel-antialiased
-moz-osx-font-smoothing: auto || inherit || unset || grayscale
font-smoothing: auto || inherit || unset || grayscale
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