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I'm trying to represent a scoreboard for a competition and am struggling with the best data structures to use.

I have a list of Player objects, a list of Round objects, and for each combination, I need to store a RoundScore object (there are various parts to the score for a round).

What I'd like is some overall Scoreboard object where the following holds:

1 - I can access a collection of RoundScore objects identified by Round keys by providing a Player object. For example, maybe something like:

public IDictionary<Round,RoundScore> PlayerScores(Player player) { ... }

2 - I can access a collection of RoundScore objects identified by Player keys by providing a Round object. e.g:

public IDictionary<Player,RoundScore> RoundScores(Round round) { ... }

3 - I can access a single RoundScore object by providing a Player and a Round

4 - I can add a new Round and all Players will get a new RoundScore for that round with default values

5 - Similarly, I can add a new Player and all Rounds will have a new RoundScore for that player with default values


I guess what I'm really looking for is a representation of a grid with Rounds on one axis, Players on the other, and RoundScores in the middle.

Is there any data structure (or combination of data structures) already in .Net that I can use for this or will I have to roll my own?

share|improve this question
    
You can add a new Player who will have a score in every round : will you will also need to deal with a case of a Round in which one or more Players are absent : (i.e., one might be kicked out of the game, another sidelined by injury, another one might have substituted for another, etc.) ? imho it's good to explicitly define the most frequent types of access to the data up front : so you optimize for those types of access. If you are going to get thousands of requests for a total score per player, but few requests for who played in a given round, imho, that should influence design. best, –  BillW Nov 18 '09 at 1:18
    
If a player is absent for a round, there are rules that set the values in that player's RoundScore for that round. In other words, there will be no missing entries in this Matrix The most frequent operations will be constructing this object from entries in the database, and turning the object into an HTML table. I don't need to handle substitutions, and I'm talking about < 100 players with < 100 rounds. –  Damovisa Nov 18 '09 at 6:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I believe you'll have to roll your own. You could store your matrix of data in one of these:

List<List<RoundScore>>

Then in Round, add a field that stores the index of that Round's scores. Likewise, in Player, add a field for that player's scores.

If the rows are the scores for a round, then returning that list is trivial. To return the list of scores for a player, you could create a class that implements IList, which knows how to access the scores by index. By doing this, you don't have to copy the scores into a new list each time they are requested.

For example:

List<Player> Players;
List<Round> Rounds;
List<List<RoundScore>> Scores;


List<RoundScore> GetRoundScores(Round round)
{
    return Scores[round.Index];
}

IList<RoundScore> GetRoundScores(Player player)
{
    return new PlayerScoreList(Scores, player.Index); // or better yet, cache this
}


public class PlayerScoreList : IList<RoundScore>
{
    private List<List<RoundScore>> _scores;
    private int _playerIndex;

    public RoundScore this[int index]
    {
        get
        {
            return _scores[_playerIndex][index];
        }
        set
        {
            _scores[_playerIndex][index] = value;
        }
    }

    public PlayerScoreList(List<List<RoundScore>> scores, int playerIndex)
    {
        _scores = scores;
        _playerIndex = playerIndex;
    }

    public void Add(RoundScore item)
    {
        throw new NotSupportedException();
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        throw new NotSupportedException();
    }

    public bool Contains(RoundScore item)
    {            
        for (int i = 0; i < Count; i++)
        {
            if (this[i].Equals(item))
            {
                return true;
            }
        }

        return false;
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get { return _scores[0].Count; }
    }

    public IEnumerator<RoundScore> GetEnumerator()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < Count; i++)
        {
            yield return this[i];
        }
    }

    // ... more methods

}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I like what you're doing, but the return values I get back are just going to be a list of scores rather than a dictionary. It looks like your code should be easy to modify to get that for me. Thanks. –  Damovisa Nov 18 '09 at 1:18
    
Yes. You could easily implement an IDictionary the same way as the IList. –  Neil Whitaker Nov 18 '09 at 17:28

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