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Is there a multiplication version to the operation a *= b for complex number arrays? In other words, what is the most efficient way to multiply all elements of an array of complex numbers (large number of elements or of unknown length) and store the result in a complex double variable?

In the following code, Ans1 provides the correct answer, however, for my application it wont make sense to address each element of the array as there will be hundreds. Ideally, I'd want to have a loop (something similar to Ans2) that multiplies all elements of the array and store the answer. If I don't initiate Ans2 as 1.0,1.0 the answer will be 0,0 as the elements will be multiplied by 0. However, initialising with 1.0,1.0 wouldnt work either as we're dealing with complex numbers.

EDIT - The reason I can't address each element manually is because this will be linked to a bigger programme where the elements of the array 'a' will come from somewhere else, and the length of 'a' will vary.

Ideally ANSWER = COMPLEX ELEMENT[0]*COMPLEX ELEMENT[1]COMPLEX ELEMENT[2]....COMPLEX ELEMENT[n]

    /*
      Complex Array Multiplication
    */

    #include <complex>
    #include <iostream>
    #include <cmath>

    using namespace std;

    int main()
    {
        int n = 3;
        complex<double> Ans1, Ans2(1.0,1.0);

        complex<double> a[n];

        a[0] = complex<double>(1.0, 1.5);
        a[1] = complex<double>(-1.0, 1.5);
        a[2] = complex<double>(1.0, -1.5);

        Ans1 = (a[0]*a[1]*a[2]);
        cout << "\nAns1 = " << Ans1;

        for (int i =0; i < n; i++) {
            Ans2 = Ans2 * a[i];
        }

        cout << "\nAns2 = " << Ans2;

        getchar();
    }

Maybe this could be done very easily but I'm missing something. Thanks in advance.

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2  
Multiplying "hundreds" of complex values isn't actually a challenge for today's computers … –  filmor Jul 8 '13 at 13:52
    
"for my application it wont make sense to address each element of the array as there will be hundreds" are you writing this program on punch cards? –  AAA Jul 8 '13 at 13:55
    
True, but having to type each element manually like I've done for Ans1 is probably not the most efficient way to use today's computers.. I've just created the array A to fill values but for my application the values will come from somewhere else. –  user2550888 Jul 8 '13 at 13:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The multiplicative identity for complex numbers is 1 + 0i, so you should initialize Ans2 to (1, 0) prior to your loop.

In case you're not familiar with the term, an identity is a value that doesn't change the result of an operation. For example, the additive identity for real numbers is 0 because a + 0 = a for any real value a. For multiplication of complex numbers, (a + bi) * (1 + 0i) = (a + bi). In your loop, you want to initialize Ans2 to a value that won't affect the result of the calculation, so you use the multiplicative identity.

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Thanks, exactly what I was looking for! –  user2550888 Jul 8 '13 at 14:05
    
No, problem, glad to help. –  Caleb Jul 8 '13 at 14:14

First of all, the line complex<double> a[n]; is not valid C++, because n is not a compiletime constant - it needs to be (at least prior to C++14). Your compiler might be implementing VLAs, but those are not part of the standard (yet).

In other words, what is the most efficient way to multiply all elements of an array of complex numbers (large number of elements or of unknown length) and store the result in a complex double variable?

You could go with std::accumulate:

#include <complex>
#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
#include <algorithm> //accumulate
#include <functional> //multiplies

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cons static int n = 3; //compiletime constant

    complex<double> a[n];

    a[0] = complex<double>(1.0, 1.5);
    a[1] = complex<double>(-1.0, 1.5);
    a[2] = complex<double>(1.0, -1.5);

    //define variables when they are needed

    //alternative 1: using std::multiplies
    auto Ans1 = std::accumulate(begin(a), end(a), complex<double>{1}, multiplies<complex<double>>{});
    cout << "\nAns1 = " << Ans1;

    //alternative 2: using a C++11 lambda
    auto Ans2 = std::accumulate(begin(a), end(a), complex<double>{1.0,1.0}, [](complex<double> a, complex<double> b) {return a*b;})
    cout << "\nAns2 = " << Ans2;

    //alternative 3: using a C++14 templated lambda
    auto Ans3 = std::accumulate(begin(a), end(a), complex<double>{1.0,1.0}, [](auto a, auto b) {return a*b;})
    cout << "\nAns3 = " << Ans3;
}  

Note: I don't know if complex(1,1) is really the initial value you want to go with - the multiplicative identity is complex(1,0)

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Thank for the comprehensive reply. I didn't know about the multiplicative identity before and that fixed the problem :) –  user2550888 Jul 8 '13 at 14:13

You can try this:

if (n>=2)
{
    complex<double> ans3 = a[0]*a[1];
    for (unsigned int i = 2; i < n; ++i)
    {
        ans3 *= a[i];
    }
    cout << "ans3 = " << ans3<<std::endl;
}
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