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  • How Can a variable with a variable name be created ?? For example $$ref;
    here $ref="name1"; or $ref ="name2" ;

  • How can a singly quoted string be converted into a doubly quoted string..? For eg.
    'Hello\n'; to "Hello\n";

  • If quotemeta is operated on a string.. can it be reverted back to its previous form..? For example "hello\\nWorld\\\$" to "hello\nWorld\$.

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Regarding "How can a singly quoted string be converted into a doubly quoted string": just use double-quotes in the first place. –  doubleDown Jul 8 '13 at 15:58
    
@doubleDown I think it's more about "how can I convert uninterpolated string into interpolated string". Looks like a job for some kind of templating system. String::Format maybe? (Haven't tried it yet) –  Dallaylaen Jul 9 '13 at 7:29
    
@doubleDown Would like to get some more input from OP though... –  Dallaylaen Jul 9 '13 at 7:32

3 Answers 3

How Can a variable with a variable name be created ?? For example $$ref;

Using single quotes instead of double quotes.

my $variableName = '$$ref';
print $variableName;

This is not very common and most probably indicates a wrong design. Ask yourself why you need this.

How can a singly quoted string be converted into a doubly quoted string..?

This question makes no sense to me. A string is a string, doesn't matter if it was single or double quoted. Once created, you don't know how it was created. What are you trying to do?

If what you want is expand variables in an existing string, the documentation is pretty clear about how to do it.

If quotemeta is operated on a string.. can it be reverted back to its previous form..?

String::Unquotemeta

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What are you trying to achieve in the end? It would be much easier to answer sensibly if you provided some context.

As of now, part 1 is asking to use a hash instead of plain variables, unless you have strong reasons not to:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;
my %hash = ( name1 => 42, name2 => 3.14 );
my $key = (rand() < 0.5) ? "name1" : "name2";
print $hash{$key};
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"What are you trying to achieve in the end? It would be much easier to answer sensibly if you provided some context." +1 –  m0skit0 Jul 9 '13 at 9:09
  1. Yes. That is called symbolic referencing and is not recommended because for security reasons. And it's hard to debug, too.

  2. Yes.

    my $text = 'Hello\n';

    ( my $interpreted = $text ) =~ s{ \\n }{\n}gmsx;

    print "'$text'\n";

    print "'$interpreted'\n";

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