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In the following program "Here" is printed:

#include <iostream>
class Base
{
  static bool temp;
  static bool initTemp()
  {std::cout<<"Here\n";return true;}
};

bool Base::temp = Base::initTemp();

class Derived : public Base
{};

int main() {int a;std::cin>>a;}

In the following program "Here" is not printed:

#include <iostream>
template <class T>
class Base
{
  static bool temp;
  static bool initTemp()
  {std::cout<<"Here\n";return true;}
};

template <class T>
bool Base<T>::temp = Base<T>::initTemp();

class Derived : public Base<int>
{};

int main() {int a;std::cin>>a;}

In both cases Base is never referenced. The only difference is that in the second case it is a template class. Can anyone explain to me why this behavior occurs. I am using VS 2012.

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2  
void main() is not legal C++. Should be int main(). –  John Dibling Jul 8 '13 at 14:15
    
In the second example, "Here" is printed if you explicitly instantiate the static member: template bool Base<int>::temp; –  willj Jul 8 '13 at 16:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In both cases Base is never referenced.

And that is precisely the reason why you see nothing being printed to the standard output.

The definition of a class template's static data member does not get instantiated unless you use that data member; like member functions, the definitions of static data members of a class template are instantiated on demand.

This is specified in paragraph 14.7.1/1 of the C++11 Standard:

[...] The implicit instantiation of a class template specialization causes the implicit instantiation of the declarations, but not of the definitions or default arguments, of the class member functions, member classes, scoped member enumerations, static data members and member templates. [...]

Since your client code never refers to Base<>::temp, there is no need to construct and initialize it.


As a side note, this signature:

void main()

Is not valid (standard) C++. If you want to write portable code, the return type of main() should always be int.

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But the code contains class Derived : Base<int> … (why) doesn’t that count as instantiation? –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 8 '13 at 14:20
    
I edited the post so that it uses int. Is there any way to instantiate the class by inheriting from it? i.e. is there any way to automatically initialize temp for many different derived types without having to write template<>bool Base<int>::temp=Base<int>::initTemp(); –  Benjy Kessler Jul 8 '13 at 14:23
    
@KonradRudolph: "The implicit instantiation of a class template specialization causes the implicit instantiation of the declarations, but not of the definitions or default arguments, of the class member functions, member classes, scoped member enumerations, static data members and member templates" (14.7.1/1) –  Andy Prowl Jul 8 '13 at 14:24
    
@BenjyKessler: OK, I will edit the answer to reflect your edit –  Andy Prowl Jul 8 '13 at 14:24

In the first case, you don't instantiate Base, but you do call the static function:

bool Base::temp = Base::initTemp();

In the second case, you never instantiate the template:

template <class T>
bool Base<T>::temp = Base<T>::initTemp();

You can explicitly instantiate the Base class template, as with:

template class Base<int>;

And then you will see "Here" printed.

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OK that's cool, I didn't know that forward declaring a template class instantiates it. –  Benjy Kessler Jul 8 '13 at 14:26
1  
@BenjyKessler: That's not a forward declaration, it's an explicit instantiation –  Andy Prowl Jul 8 '13 at 14:27
    
@BenjyKessler: lol, yes, edited the comment. My brain is sleeping –  Andy Prowl Jul 8 '13 at 14:30

You cannot create variable of undefined class, which you seem to do with line:

template <class T>
bool Base<T>::temp = Base<T>::initTemp();

You cannot allocate variable of undefined type. What you need is write something like:

Base<int>::temp = value;

of cause there will be different variable allocated for each type provided, so you cannot have common static variable for a template class. You'll have separate variable for each type you instantiate your template instead.

To downvoters here is complete example:

#include <iostream>

template<class T>
class X
{
public:
    static int v;
};

template<class T>
int X<T>::v = 0;

int main()
{
    X<int>::v = 3;
    X<char>::v = 2;

    using namespace std;
    cout << X<char>::v << endl << X<int>::v;
}

It prints 2 3 which means you cannot have single variable for all classes you'll instantiate your template.

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1  
You absolutely can. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 8 '13 at 14:21
    
I think what Bogolt meant is that for every different instanstiation of X you will have a different value of v. That is true but I want to have a different value of v for every instantiation. In order to share the same static variable among all instantiations X should inherit from some non-template base class which contains v. –  Benjy Kessler Jul 8 '13 at 14:32
    
Your code example actually shows that you can do exactly what you claim you cannot do. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 8 '13 at 14:42
    
I claim that when you use variable of a template class it depends on a type template was instantiated. And that by creating single variable you actually create a number of variables for each class instantiation. Do not really see when i was saying the opposite. –  Bogolt Jul 8 '13 at 15:07
    
Well you claim that “What you need is write something like: Base<int>::temp = value;” and that is patently untrue. The rest is just distraction. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 9 '13 at 12:43

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