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While testing objects and functions of a project in Matlab using matlab.unittest.TestCase classes (new to 2013a), sometimes a plot is needed to visualise the actual/expected data.

I have so far used the following method but feel this isn't the best way:

classdef test1 < matlab.unittest.TestCase

properties
    var1=3; var2=5;    % sample variables
    graph_output = 0;  % boolean
end

methods(Test)
    function testfunction(testCase)
        my_result = my_fun(testCase.var1, testCase.var2);
        testCase.verifyEqual(my_result,expected_result)

        if testCase.graph_output
            plot(my_result)
        end
    end
end

In the command line, I use test_obj=test1 and then test_obj.graph_output=1 before using run(test_obj) to output graphs as well as testing the function.

A better way to do this would be to use a separate method. I have tried this by allocating my_result to the properties list, but after the test completes, matlab seems to re-initialise my_result making the output graph meaningless.

Does anyone know a way round this, or any better way of outputting test results on demand?

share|improve this question
    
Generally when I'm writing tests, I'm only interested in looking at the results if the tests have failed. Is this the same for you? –  Huguenot Jul 8 '13 at 18:10
    
I think this is one of those cases where its ok to use global variables: stackoverflow.com/a/1842390/97160 . But I agree with @Huguenot, unit-tests are meant to be run automated, and we are only interested in results that fail.. –  Amro Jul 8 '13 at 20:45
    
Before using these TestCase classes, I used scripts to test modules of my code, but they were also used as as a learning tool to visualise data flow. I suppose I should separate the two now that my project is getting bigger and create different files to test and experiment. Thanks again! –  PhD_Dan Jul 9 '13 at 10:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Usually when people are interested in looking at results from a specific test it's because something has gone wrong. This is a good opportunity to use custom diagnostics. Here is one that prints out a link to the MATLAB command window which plots the expected value against the actual value, as well as printing out links which will load the data from the test into the workspace.

classdef test1 < matlab.unittest.TestCase

methods(Test)
    function firstTest(testCase)
        import matlab.unittest.constraints.IsEqualTo;

        % Test should pass!
        actualValue = 1:10;
        expectedValue = 1:10;

        diagnostic = @()myPlotDiagnostic(actualValue, expectedValue);

        testCase.verifyThat(actualValue, IsEqualTo(expectedValue), diagnostic);
    end

    function secondTest(testCase)
        import matlab.unittest.constraints.IsEqualTo;

        % Test should fail with a diagnostic!
        actualValue = [1 2 3 4 12 6 7 8 9 10];
        expectedValue = 1:10;

        diagnostic = @()myPlotDiagnostic(actualValue, expectedValue);

        testCase.verifyThat(actualValue, IsEqualTo(expectedValue), diagnostic);
    end

    function thirdTest(testCase)
        import matlab.unittest.constraints.IsEqualTo;

        % Test should also fail with a diagnostic!
        actualValue = [1 2 3 4 -12 6 7 8 9 10];
        expectedValue = 1:10;

        diagnostic = @()myPlotDiagnostic(actualValue, expectedValue);

        testCase.verifyThat(actualValue, IsEqualTo(expectedValue), diagnostic);
    end
end

end

function myPlotDiagnostic(actualValue, expectedValue)
temporaryFile = tempname;
save(temporaryFile, 'actualValue', 'expectedValue');
fprintf('<a href="matlab:plot([%s], [%s], ''*r'')">Plot Data</a>\n', num2str(expectedValue), num2str(actualValue));
fprintf('<a href="matlab:load(''%s'')">Load data into workspace</a>\n', temporaryFile);
end

Running this test will result in outputs which contain

  • Links which will load the actual and expected values into the workspace
  • Links which when clicked will produce the following graphs:

enter image description here

enter image description here

These will of course only show up though if the test fails, but this is generally the desired behaviour anyway!

N.B. I prefer to use the IsEqualTo syntax so that the tests read (almost) like English. But this is a style decision.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 clever idea of using hyperlinked output –  Amro Jul 8 '13 at 20:48
    
Thanks for your response, I really like this solution for loading the variables into workspace! :D –  PhD_Dan Jul 9 '13 at 10:57

You can do this not only for failing conditions but also for passing conditions with a combination of custom diagnostics and the DiagnosticsValidationPlugin. You can do this quickly using a function handle, but if this is something you find you want to do often for many of your tests, consider creating your own subclass of Diagnostic:

classdef PlotDiagnostic < matlab.unittest.diagnostics.Diagnostic

    properties
        Title
        Actual
        Expected
    end

    methods
        function diag = PlotDiagnostic(title, actual, expected)
            diag.Title = title;
            diag.Actual = actual;
            diag.Expected = expected;
        end
        function diagnose(diag)
            diag.DiagnosticResult = sprintf('Generating plot with title "%s"', diag.Title);
            f = figure('Title', diag.Title);
            ax = axes('Parent', f);
            plot(ax, 1:numel(diag.Actual), diag.Actual, 'r', 1:numel(diag.Expected), diag.Expected','b');
        end
    end
end

Then you can have a test that uses this like so:

classdef FooTest < matlab.unittest.TestCase

    methods(Test)
        function testFails(testCase)
            actual = 1:10;
            expected = fliplr(actual);
            testCase.verifyEqual(actual, expected, PlotDiagnostic('Title1', actual, expected));
        end
        function testPasses(testCase)
            actual = 1:10;
            expected = actual;
            testCase.verifyEqual(actual, expected, PlotDiagnostic('Title2', actual, expected));
        end
    end
end

Now once you have those as test diagnostics you will see them in failure conditions. However, you can also see them in passing conditions using the DiagnosticsValidationPlugin, which evaluates diagnostics even in passing conditions to ensure the diagnostic code is bug free (it would be super lame to not catch diagnostic info from a real failure because there was a bug in the diagnostic code that is typically not exercised). This would look like:

>> import matlab.unittest.*;
>> runner = TestRunner.withNoPlugins;
>> runner.addPlugin(matlab.unittest.plugins.DiagnosticsValidationPlugin);
>> suite = TestSuite.fromClass(?FooTest);
>> runner.run(suite)
share|improve this answer
2  
Also, it seems I do not have enough street cred to comment on Huguenot's answer (which is a good one btw), but I wanted to mention that you do not need to explicitly create the FunctionHandleDiagnostic when calling verifyThat. The diagnostic argument can be a string, a function handle, or any other Diagnostic subclass. If it is the first it is converted to a StringDiagnostic, if it is the second it is converted to a FunctionHandleDiagnostic. Furthermore, this conversion happens only when the diagnostics are used so you dont even pay the penalty of creating these objects in most passing cases. –  Andy Campbell Jul 9 '13 at 21:42
    
Thanks Andy, this is a great answer! I've updated my answer with your suggestion. –  Huguenot Jul 10 '13 at 6:35

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