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I have several Java Objects using the following classes (all part of the same super class).

Object Class one:

Class one extends Superobject {
    int no;
    int i;
    String s;
}

Object Class two:

Class two extends Superobject {
    int no;
    int i;
    String s;
}

I want to create many of these Objects by reading a text file and calling the constructor for Object one and Object two after every word.

I have tried storing all the Objects in a list in the super class, but somehow, I can't get the list to be non-static.

Class Superobject {
    int no;
    int i;
    String s;
    List<Superobject> li; // of course, when called with the
    //method below: static List<Superobject> li
    }

When I try to add Objects to the list, eclipse yells that li has to be made static.

public static void somemethod(Object one[] ones) {
    for (one o : ones) {
        li.add(o);
    }
}

Is there a way to make it non-static or is there a better way to store the Objects?

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learn to indent code –  Grijesh Chauhan Jul 8 '13 at 14:16
1  
It would be better if you show your method declaration as well. –  Luiggi Mendoza Jul 8 '13 at 14:16
1  
@GrijeshChauhan looks like that's OP's problem to learn format code in the page. –  Luiggi Mendoza Jul 8 '13 at 14:17
    
It would be great if we could see all your methods and how you are acalling them –  Prasad Kharkar Jul 8 '13 at 14:19
    
Do you want each Superobject instance to contain a list of its different children, or do you want one single master list? –  Aggieboy Jul 8 '13 at 14:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Non static methods are associated with instances of the class, while static methods are associated with class itself. You are trying to access a non static member from static method. So, the compiler cannot associate the non-static member with any object.

What you can do is either make both of them static, which you should as you trying to save several instances of Superobject in the list. If you dont make it static, every instance of Superobject will have its own list. OR you can create a separate class and call it SuperobjectCollection and provide methods such as Add, Remove, Get etc to access the underlying List.

Consider the following pseudocode

class SuperobjectCollection {
private List<Superobject> list;

  public AddObj(Superobject obj) {
    list.add(obj);
  }
}

You can add any logic as you see during adding, retrieving, or removing objects.

If you want to keep the list in Superobject class, you have to make it static and access it using static method. If you don't do that (like the code that you have presented), you would have following situation:

Class Superobject {
    int no;
    int i;
    String s;
    List<Superobject> li; 
    }

If you create two instances like:

Superobject a = new one();
Superobject b = new two();

Both a and b would contain separate li. If your somemethod is non-static you can then access this list in that method like

li.add();

or like

this.li.add();

Here this is either object a if you called the method like a.somemethod() or b if you called it like b.somemethod()

Static methods are associate with class not instance, and as such you access it like so:

Superobject.someobject();

not like

a.someobject();
share|improve this answer
    
But then i would still need to first store the instances of one and two in lists, right? And the collection class would receive the list into its constructor? –  user2336713 Jul 9 '13 at 10:17
    
you need to understand that if you defining a list in superobject class, it will belong to instance of that class only. If you create a new instance of superobject or any of its derived classes, it will create a new list. If you want to save instances of superobject and its derived classes then you have to either make that list static and access it using static function (if it is private) or create a separate class that act as collection as I recommended. –  Ata Jul 9 '13 at 10:36
    
okay, thanks for the thorough explanation. –  user2336713 Jul 9 '13 at 17:03

It seems you're trying to access your non-static member l from the static method somemethod. You need to either change somemethod to be non-static as well or make l static.

share|improve this answer
    
This is what I want, but I cannot make the somemethod non-static, as another method requires it to be static. Does this mean I definately cannot have a non-static List as an instance variable? –  user2336713 Jul 8 '13 at 16:14
    
non-static variables can only be accessed using the actual object they belong to. So, you can of course have a non-static List but need to access it by qualifier.list. –  Michael Lang Jul 8 '13 at 19:51

It would be a terrible design decision, but assuming you can change the signature of the static method, this would help.

public static void somemethod(Object one[] ones, List<Superobject> li) {
    for (one o : ones) {
        li.add(o);
    }
}

However, if you could change the signature of this method, you'd probably want to make it non-static anyway.

On the other hand, if all you want to achieve is to add the elements to the list. Why doesn't the following work for you?

li.addAll(Arrays.asList(ones));
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