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struct CCompare
{
    const bool operator()(const int& lhs, const int& rhs) const {
        return lhs < rhs;
    }
};

Warning 1 warning C4180: qualifier applied to function type has no meaning;

I saw the usage with return value as const bool in a programming book. When I compiled the above code with vs2010, it reports the warning C4180.

The following code instead will not cause the same warning.

struct CCompare
{
    bool operator()(const int& lhs, const int& rhs) const {
        return lhs < rhs;
    }
};

Question1> Is it true that the usage of const Fundamental_Data_Types as a function returned value doesn't make sense?

Question2> Is it true that the usage of const Type as a function returned value only makes sense iff the Type is a class/struct?

Thank you

// Update //

struct CClass
{
    int val;
    CClass(int _val) : val(_val) {}

    void SetValue(int _val) {
        val = _val;
    }
};

struct CCompare
{
    const CClass getMe() const {
        return CClass(10);
    }

    CClass getMeB() const {
        return CClass(10);
    }
};

int main(/*int argc, char *argv[]*/) 
{
    CCompare c;

    c.getMe().SetValue(20);   // error
    c.getMeB().SetValue(20);  // ok
}
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marked as duplicate by interjay, John Zwinck, Hasturkun, Arne Mertz, Graviton Jul 9 '13 at 2:55

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
In both cases, the return value is copied to the caller. You have no right to enforce const on a copied value they're getting back. –  chris Jul 8 '13 at 14:32
4  
const only makes sense if you return a reference or a pointer, regardless of whether it is a class/struct or fundamental type. –  Roger Rowland Jul 8 '13 at 14:33
    
vc2012 no warning. –  Jichao Jul 8 '13 at 14:36
    
@RogerRowland Refer to Effective C++ 3rd pp 18 const Rational operator*(const Rational&, const Rational&); –  q0987 Jul 8 '13 at 14:42
    
@q0987 Ok, but my copy is at home, so it will have to wait unless you can explain? –  Roger Rowland Jul 8 '13 at 14:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Yes and yes to both of your questions. Return values are rvalues, and cv-qualifiers only apply to rvalues if they have a class type.

The reason for this is fairly simple: there's normally nothing you can do with an rvalue where const-ness would make a difference—it's a value, after all, and not an object. With a class type, there are member functions to take into account (which means that you can get an lvalue from the rvalue), so const-ness suddenly becomes relevant.

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Can you detail why cv-qualifiers only apply to rvalues? const int leftValue = 10. Here the const is applied to a lvalue. I assume that I misunderstood your point. –  q0987 Jul 8 '13 at 15:18
    
@q0987 You're misreading me. const can apply to all lvalues. It can only apply to rvalues if they have class type. –  James Kanze Jul 8 '13 at 16:00

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