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Following HATEOAS principles that each states should be hyperlinked, what is the best way to model links that change resource state?

Let's take classical example with orders:

{
   id : 12,
   state: 'pending',
   ...,
   links: [
     ...,
     { 
       rel: 'cancel',
       href: '/orders/12/cancel'
     },
     ...
   ]
}

I am not totall happy with that "/cancel" part - I would feel a lot better if I could send "PUT" request with contents:

{
   status:'cancelled'
}

But how do I represent that with "href" attribute in links section? I would like to represent available actions there since, for example, cancelling an order isn't always possible ('completed' state).

One possibility would be to use URL like '/orders/12?action=cancel' what it kinda feels like RPC approach and that I am missing something.

Another possibility that looks probably nicest, would be to have links like that:

{
  rel: 'cancel',
  href: '/orders/12/',
  type: 'PUT',
  values: {
    state: 'cancelled'
  }
}

This solution maybe feels a little bit verbose.

Any ideas how to handle that gracefully? Maybe someone has already solved similar "problem"?

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3 Answers

I would suggest either of these two models. The first is the classic one, but with rel="edit-form" and using PATCH where available. The second is an alternative which comes about through some lateral thinking about how the HTTP resource model maps onto your application domain model (namely, that the two don't have to have a 1:1 mapping).


Solution 1

Edit the resource in-place.

HTML compatible:

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: text/html
Location: /orders/1/

...<a rel="edit-form" href="./edit">Edit</a>...

 

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: text/html
Location: /orders/1/edit

...
<form action="../" method="POST">
    <input type="hidden" name="_METHOD" value="PATCH">
    <button type="submit" name="status" value="cancelled">Cancel Order</button>
</form>
...

 

POST /orders/1 HTTP/1.1
Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded

_METHOD=PATCH&status=cancelled

Rich client (e.g. HTML+Javascript) compatible:

PATCH /orders/1 HTTP/1.1
Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded

status=cancelled

and/or

PATCH /orders/1 HTTP/1.1
Content-Type: text/json

{
    "status": "cancelled"
}

the _METHOD key is a well-known means of providing REST frameworks with the correct method due to HTML's lack of support for HTTP.


Solution 2

Or, Delete the resource (and, incidentally, create a new one)

DELETE /orders/1 HTTP/1.1

 

HTTP/1.1 201 Created
Location: /cancelled-orders/1

For more info on this way of mapping web resources to domain objects, please see my answer to a similar question.

Another answer you may wish to read is this one.

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Modelling resources is the most difficult part of REST. Strictly adhering to the standard means if you see yourself ever doing this: /resource/:id/{action}, you're violating the "using HTTP correctly" criteria, as your endpoints should ideally always be "nouns', never "verbs" (the verbs are what the HTTP protocol provides).

So, while "it depends" (ie. the hard part of designing resources), typically: Object model states can be considered as resources themselves.

Which means, your order status is actually a resource you can query (either as a standalone /orderstatuses resource or as a sub resource eg. /orders/:id/status)

Your Application State can now link to the status resource based on the current status of the order itself. If your 'status' schema looks something like this (pseudo):

key: 'status'
values: ['pending', 'cancelled']

Your app could then PUT /order/:id/status {status:'cancelled'} (a well formed status) back to the API, which would then act to cancel your order. It's a little weird thinking in these terms (RPC is a lot more intuitive), but hopefully this helps.

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I don't think this is how links should work...

You should use simply:

{
  rel: 'cancel',
  href: '/orders/12/',
}

And the client should know that cancel means a PUT request to the service. The service will set the resource to a cancelled state, and return the new links which are active in that state. So the client has nothing to do with the states, the states are handled by the REST service.

There are link relations already in use, but you can always add your custom words to that dictionary...

The concrete implementation of this: before sending request to the REST service, the client checks the activated link. If it has rel=cancel, then the client sets the method="PUT" and the data={status:"cancelled"}. So this should work automatically. You should never give the http method manually, the http method comes from the link rel automatically... I think the best way for cancelling is method="DELETE", but that is my opinion...

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