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I have a large number data sets with observations of the abundance of a varying number of species per time interval. The data sets spans several years and I would like to calculate the mean monthly/quarterly abundance per species.

the input matrix looks like this:

>   start      end         G_rub  G_sac P_obl N_dut G_glu G_bul G_men  
1.  17/05/2004 13/06/2004  22     140   0     9     7     0     2  
2.  14/06/2004 11/07/2004  453    53    11    124   356   57    13   
3.  12/07/2004 08/08/2004  406    114   15    145   158   44    2    

I hope to get a matrix that looks something like this:

>month  G_rub  G_sac P_obl N_dut G_glu G_bul G_men  
 jan  
 feb         
 mar 
 etc... 

I am new to R, but my solution would be to try something along these lines:
1) create a matrix that contains the number of days per month for each observation interval
2) multiply by the abundance per species for these intervals
3) divide the sum of the columns of these matrices by total number of days per month for the entire observation period
4) combine these vectors into new matrix that looks something like the above

I have just learned how to do step one, but get stuck with looping through the species list.

Any help on how to do this, or on different approaches is much appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

I would approach it as follows:

FUNCTION TO CALCULATE FOR A SINGLE PERIOD

calculateForOnePeriod <- function(DT, date.start, date.end, period.name, frmt="%d/%m/%Y", DateCols, SpeciesCols) {

  date.start <- as.Date(as.character(date.start), format=frmt)
  date.end   <- as.Date(as.character(date.end),   format=frmt)

  #  find the relevant rows, by date.  Namely starting from the largest (start <= start.date) and ending with the smallest (end >= end.date)
  row.index.min <- DT[, max(which(start <= date.start), -1)]
  row.index.max <- DT[, min(which(end >= date.end), -1)]
  #  the `-1` are to indicate out of range

  # if both are negative one, date not present at all 
  # otherwise, if just one of the two are -1, match to the valid value (ie, single row range)
  if (row.index.max == -1  &&  row.index.min == -1) {
    return(DT[, c(period=period.name, lapply(.SD, function(x) 0)), .SDcols=SpeciesCols])
  } else if (row.index.max == - 1) {
    row.index.max <- row.index.min
  } else if (row.index.min == - 1) {
    row.index.min <- row.index.max
  }

  DT2 <- DT[row.index.min : row.index.max, 
      # calculate the weighted averages
     {
       # n.days are the intersects
       n.days <- length(intersect(seq.Date(start, end, by=1), seq.Date(date.start, date.end, by=1)))
       lapply(.SD, `*`, n.days)
     }
     , by=DateCols
     , .SDcols=SpeciesCols 
  ]
  DT2[, c(period=period.name, lapply(.SD, function(x) sum(x, na.rm=TRUE) / as.numeric(1+date.end-date.start))), .SDcols=SpeciesCols]
}

SETUP THE data.table

library(data.table)

# convert to data.table
DT <- data.table(dat)

# grab all of the species columns. Modify this accordingly to your real data
DateCols    <- c("start", "end")
SpeciesCols <- setdiff(names(DT), DateCols) 

# Make sure your dates are in fact dates (and not, say, just strings or factors)
DT[, start := as.Date(as.character(start), format="%d/%m/%Y")]
DT[, end   := as.Date(as.character(end), format="%d/%m/%Y")]

# ensure that data is sorted by start, end
setkeyv(DT, DateCols)

USAGE:

just create a vector of start/end dates and iterate simple example:

first.date <- as.Date("01/01/2004", "%d/%m/%Y")
interv   <- "month"  # needs to be a valid value of `by=` in ?seq.Date
total.periods <- 12   # how many periods to analyze

starting.dates <- seq.Date(from=first.date, by="month", length.out=total.periods+1)  # +1 for ending dates
ending.dates   <- starting.dates - 1

starting.dates <- head(starting.dates, -1)
ending.dates   <- tail(ending.dates,   -1)

# sample period.names..  this will need to be modified
period.names  <- month.abb[month(starting.dates)]

# Note that format is now  "2004-06-01"
frmt.exmp <- "%Y-%m-%d"

## have a look:
data.frame(starting.dates, ending.dates)


# iterate using mapply
res.list <- 
  mapply(calculateForOnePeriod, date.start=starting.dates, date.end=ending.dates, period.name=period.names
      , MoreArgs=list(DT=DT, frmt=frmt.exmp, DateCols=DateCols, SpeciesCols=SpeciesCols), SIMPLIFY=FALSE)

# combine into a single data.table
res <- rbindlist(res.list)

# optionally clean 0's to NA
ZeroRows <- apply(res[, !"period", with=FALSE]==0, 1, all)
res[ZeroRows, c(SpeciesCols) := NA]

RESULTS:

res

    period      G_rub    G_sac    P_obl    N_dut      G_glu    G_bul     G_men
 1:    Jan         NA       NA       NA       NA         NA       NA        NA
 2:    Feb         NA       NA       NA       NA         NA       NA        NA
 3:    Mar         NA       NA       NA       NA         NA       NA        NA
 4:    Apr         NA       NA       NA       NA         NA       NA        NA
 5:    May         NA       NA       NA       NA         NA       NA        NA
 6:    Jun   9.533333 60.66667 0.000000  3.90000   3.033333  0.00000 0.8666667
 7:    Jul 160.741935 18.80645 3.903226 44.00000 126.322581 20.22581 4.6129032
 8:    Aug 104.774194 29.41935 3.870968 37.41935  40.774194 11.35484 0.5161290
 9:    Sep         NA       NA       NA       NA         NA       NA        NA
10:    Oct         NA       NA       NA       NA         NA       NA        NA
11:    Nov         NA       NA       NA       NA         NA       NA        NA
12:    Dec         NA       NA       NA       NA         NA       NA        NA
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much for your help, but this is not really what I am after. My example above is just a part of a data set and what I would like to calculate is the monthly mean, not just the mean of the interval that started in a specific month. In the case of G_rub that would be 22/13 + 453/(30-14+1) for the month of June. Any suggestions? –  Lukas Jul 9 '13 at 8:10
    
Hi Lukas, I am not sure that the math is correct in that regards. In other words, is that really giving you a monthly/quarterly mean? That being said, please see the edit –  Ricardo Saporta Jul 9 '13 at 18:03
    
Thanks Ricardo, I tried your suggestions and came up with a different solution (see answer). I am sure there are more elegant ways to achieve this, but it seems to work. –  Lukas Jul 11 '13 at 21:23

It took me a while (still trying to discover R), but I think this works well. Hope that this is of use to someone.

# get species
  species <- subset(data, select = -c(open, close))
# get open close dates
  open <- as.Date(data$open, "%d/%m/%Y")
  close <- as.Date(data$close, "%d/%m/%Y")

# calculate number of days per month
days <- mapply(function(x,y)
           {
              vv <- vector('integer',12)
              names(vv) <- c(paste0('0',1:9),10:12)
              ff <- table(format(seq(x,y,1),'%m'))
              vv[names(ff)] <- ff
              vv
           },
        open,close)

days <- t(days)         

# mean flux for months
monthdays <- colSums (days)
sp_days <- lapply(species, '*', days)
sp_month <- lapply(sp_days, 'colSums',na.rm = T)
sum_month_flux <- lapply(sp_month,'/',monthdays)
month_flux <- do.call(cbind,sum_month_flux)


> month_flux
      G_rub     G_sac     P_obl     N_dut    G_glu   G_bul    G_men
01      NaN       NaN       NaN       NaN      NaN     NaN      NaN
02      NaN       NaN       NaN       NaN      NaN     NaN      NaN
03      NaN       NaN       NaN       NaN      NaN     NaN      NaN
04      NaN       NaN       NaN       NaN      NaN     NaN      NaN
05  22.0000 140.00000  0.000000   9.00000   7.0000  0.0000 2.000000
06 266.2333  90.70000  6.233333  74.16667 204.7667 32.3000 8.233333
07 422.6774  92.35484 13.580645 137.54839 228.2581 48.6129 5.903226
08 406.0000 114.00000 15.000000 145.00000 158.0000 44.0000 2.000000
09      NaN       NaN       NaN       NaN      NaN     NaN      NaN
10      NaN       NaN       NaN       NaN      NaN     NaN      NaN
11      NaN       NaN       NaN       NaN      NaN     NaN      NaN
12      NaN       NaN       NaN       NaN      NaN     NaN      NaN
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