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please take this very simple example:

volatile int globalVar = 1;

My thread:

if (globalVar > 0) {
    globalVar--;
}

Now, I have to decide whether making the variable volatile is sufficient to prevent a race-condition and make this thread safe.

I know incrementing and decrementing is not, but I'm not sure if it's different, because of the preceding condition.

I think it still is not safe, because it could be executed in this order:

Thread A checks condition. Thread B checks condition. Thread A increments. Thread B increments.

Am I right?

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2  
That's not the only reason; decrementing alone is not thread-safe. –  SLaks Jul 8 '13 at 16:51
1  
You need to think of globalVar-- as the thread loading globalVar, subtracting one from the result, and writing the new value to globalVar, three separate operations. –  Patricia Shanahan Jul 8 '13 at 17:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are correct. It is NOT thread safe for the reason you state. volatile ensures that two threads will both see updated values of a variable but is does not protect around multiple lines of code.

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1  
It doesn't even protect single lines of code - the globalVar-- is not atomic. –  Paul Cager Jul 8 '13 at 17:01
    
Which the OP highlighed: I know incrementing and decrementing is not –  John B Jul 8 '13 at 17:06

No its not Thread safe. Volatile doesn't guarantee Atomicity. Operations like i-- are not atomic so declaring i as volatile doesn't help.

int globalVar = 1;

lock.lock()
try{
  if(globalVar > 0)
          globalVar--;

}finally {
   lock.unlock();
}

The above code will work, you don't need to declare golbalVar as volatile here because
Volatile Gives Two Guarantees: 1. Visibility 2. Reordering

Whereas

Synchronization/lock/unlock Give Three guarantees 1.Atomicity 2. Visibility 3.Reordering

Also Remember whenever an Object is shared among multiple threads always access that object under any synchronization action synchronization/volatile read/write.

Read an Excellent Article here by the Author Chapter 17 of JLS. Its a must read http://jeremymanson.blogspot.in/2008/11/what-volatile-means-in-java.html http://docs.oracle.com/javase/specs/jls/se7/html/jls-17.html

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To make your code thread safe you need to add a synchronized block around the check and modification.

An example of what can be done:

volatile Integer globalVar = 1;

Then in the method that does the work you can:

synchronized public void decrement(){
    if(globalVar > 0)
          globalVar--;
    }
}
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1  
This will not work. globalVar is immutable, so the modifications to it will create a new object, which means different threads will be locking on different objects. This is why you should normally synchronize on final references. –  Michael Krussel Jul 10 '13 at 14:13

volatile does not guarantees for Atomicity. you can simply add a synchronized block.

synchronized(this)
{
 if (globalVar > 0) {
   globalVar--;
 }
}
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