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I am fairly new to CUDA and would like to know more about complex number arithmetic and its speed implications.

I need to solve the following complex number equation for all elements in the 'j[]' array and store the answer in 'Ans[]':

Ans [0] = (2.0/((20.5*(j[0]*j[0]))+(5.55*j[0])+20));
Ans [1] = (2.0/((20.5*(j[1]*j[1]))+(5.55*j[1])+20));
...
...
...
Ans [n] = (2.0/((20.5*(j[n]*j[n]))+(5.55*j[n])+20));

Since I need to perform the same calculation to all elements of 'j' I can parallelize this code and have each thread/block take care of each calculation (blockIdx.x = 0 -> Ans [0] etc.) From what I understand, if I do this for a lot of elements in parallel I should be able to see an increase in speed. However, what can be written in one line of c++ code takes a few lines to do in the GPU.

My question is, do all the additional lines of code mean longer processing time as it involves saving intermediate values in numerous temps. If so, would it still make sense to do this sort of calculation in the GPU when the number of elements are less than, say, 1000? (arbitrary number)

The equation:

C++ -> Ans [0] = (2.0/((20.5*(j[0]*j[0]))+(5.55*j[0])+20));

My GPU version of it:

int tid = blockIdx.x;

    temp1[tid] = cuCmul(j[tid], j[tid]);
    temp2[tid] = cuCmul(temp1[tid], make_cuDoubleComplex(20.5, 0));
    temp3[tid] = cuCmul(j[tid], make_cuDoubleComplex(5.55, 0));
    temp4[tid] = cuCadd(temp2[tid], temp3[tid]);
    temp5[tid] = cuCadd(temp4[tid], make_cuDoubleComplex(20, 0));
    Ans[tid] = cuCdiv(make_cuDoubleComplex(2.0, 0), temp5[tid]);

Also, please let me know if there is a more efficient way to write this for the GPU

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

what can be written in one line of c++ code takes a few lines to do in the GPU.

This probably isn't true, at least for the example you've shown. You seem to be worried about temporary storage, but the compiler (both host and GPU) is pretty good about figuring out whether temporary storage makes sense or not, and optimizing it in or out. Many programmers fall into the trap of thinking that the C code they wrote is a good representation of what the machine will do, in terms of storage usage and order of operations, but with modern compilers this is typically not the case.

As an example, you said that this was your CPU code:

Ans [0] = (2.0/((20.5*(j[0]*j[0]))+(5.55*j[0])+20));

The GPU version could be written as:

Ans [0] = cuCdiv(make_cuDoubleComplex(2.0, 0), cuCadd(cuCadd(cuCmul(cuCmul(j[tid], j[tid]), make_cuDoubleComplex(20.5, 0)), cuCmul(j[tid], make_cuDoubleComplex(5.55, 0))), make_cuDoubleComplex(20, 0)));

making no usage of explicit temporary storage. (The code is certainly hard to read, however.) But what goes on "under the hood" in the host (C) or device (GPU) case may look different. The compiler is generally better than the programmer at figuring how to optimize one or a few lines of code like this.

Get your code working first. Then benchmark (time) it. Then decide if you want to take a closer look at optimization. Tools like the visual profiler can help quite a bit with discovering optimization opportunities.

Even though your host C-code looks quite simple, bear in mind that a complex number still has 2 quantities associated with it. Even though this isn't obvious looking at the (abstracted) C code, "under the hood" the compiler is still doing the necessary operations to treat the numbers separately as appropriate for the various operations of +,-,*,/

My question is, do all the additional lines of code mean longer processing time as it involves saving intermediate values in numerous temps.

Not necessarily, for the reasons I described above. You're doing mostly the same work with either realization, and the compiler will observe this and probably generate similar machine code.

If so, would it still make sense to do this sort of calculation in the GPU when the number of elements are less than, say, 1000? (arbitrary number)

If the total number of answers you're computing like this is ~1000, then your problem is "pretty small" for a modern GPU. A modern GPU might have 8 (or more) SM's each capable of running 1 to 3 warps (32 threads) simultaneously, and the machine also needs a considerable stable of warps that are "ready to run" so as to keep all pipelines (memory, compute, etc.) busy. 1000 threads might be the bare minimum to achieve decent utilization of the GPU. Obviously, it depends a lot on which GPU or GPUs you will run on. A small, low end GPU in a notebook PC, for example, may be able to achieve high utilization with an even smaller problem. But if the extent of your calculations are 1000 of the type you've shown here, I can't imagine it takes very much time on the CPU (host code) either.

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Thanks again! Will convert the entire code to CUDA first and time it afterwards to optimise it like you said. A (slightly unrelated) follow up question: The reason I said 1000 values is because I was thinking of GPU memory limitations. Will the GPU be able to store and do arithmetic functions on 1000s of complex doubles and other constants? –  user2550888 Jul 9 '13 at 12:45
    
Probably. To some degree it depends on the GPU, but most modern GPUs today have at least 1 GB of memory (and we can structure pipelined copy/compute algorithms that are not really limited by this memory size anyway) and I can store quite a few numbers in that amount of memory. If even only half of it is available for data storage, that is enough storage for about 33 million cuDoubleComplex quantities. If each of your threads ultimately processed/required 100 unique quantities, you could still handle over 300,000 threads. –  Robert Crovella Jul 9 '13 at 13:04

CUDA works with a subset of C++. One of the supported features is overloading operators.

__device__ __host__ cuDoubleComplex  operator*(cuDoubleComplex a, cuDoubleComplex b) { return cuCmul(a,b); }
__device__ __host__ cuDoubleComplex  operator+(cuDoubleComplex a, cuDoubleComplex b) { return cuCadd(a,b); }
__device__ __host__ cuDoubleComplex  operator/(cuDoubleComplex a, cuDoubleComplex b) { return cuCdiv(a,b); }

You can similarly overload the operators when one of the inputs is a double instead of cuDoubleComplex.

If you are not using the same operations in other kernels, it is probably best to continue doing what you are doing. But if you are working on large projects where you will need to keep using similar operations in other kernels, it is best to have a header file with all these overloaded operators.

My question is, do all the additional lines of code mean longer processing time as it involves saving intermediate values in numerous temps. If so, would it still make sense to do this sort of calculation in the GPU when the number of elements are less than, say, 1000? (arbitrary number)

The compiler should usually generate the same number of temporary variables for the same operations irrespective of the lines of code. The speedups come from the number of parallel operations being done by the GPU. At about 1000 elements a single threaded host side implementation should be able to beat a CUDA kernel doing just these operations. There are overheads involved in copying data from host to device, launching the kernel, reading and writing to global memory etc.

A CUDA enabled GPU is usually capable of running thousands of threads at a time. And each thread should have a relatively high compute to bandwidth ratio to use the GPU optimally.

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Will there be a speed increase in having the overload operators as opposed to what I am doing at the moment? –  user2550888 Jul 9 '13 at 12:32
    
@user2550888 It will increase the readability and may perhaps help with debugging your code. It will most likely not affect the performance of your code. –  Pavan Yalamanchili Jul 9 '13 at 12:38
    
Got it, thank you! –  user2550888 Jul 9 '13 at 12:49

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