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Here's what I have in mind:

Given an array of objects:

[
    {
        "name": "Kirk",
        "count": 1
    },
    {
        "name": "Spock",
        "count": 1
    },
    {
        "name": "Kirk",
        "count": 1
    }
]

I am trying to get:

[
    {
        "name": "Kirk",
        "count": 2
    },
    {
        "name": "Spock",
        "count": 1
    }
]

I am wondering if there's already an algorithm, perhaps combining some higher order functions to achieve this. I could do this easily with loops, but I am looking for a way to solve it using higher order functions. If someone could point me to what I should use to achieve this, it would be great. Again, I'm looking for something as elegant as possible (two maps and a filter would not be a big improvement from loops).

This is my current solution and I'm looking for something better (and by better I mean more expressive):

function mergeDuplicates(input) {
  var output = [];
  var existingItem = null;
  input.forEach(function (inputItem) {
    existingItem = _.find(output, function (outputItem) {
      return inputItem.name === outputItem.name;
    });
    existingItem ? existingItem.count += 1 : output.push({
      name: inputItem.name,
      count: 1
    });
    existingItem = null;
  });
  return output;
}

To make line #10 more clear: in the original array, count might be either non-existing or 1, hence I set it to 1.

share|improve this question
    
I'm pretty sure I have seen this question on StackOverflow before. (Don't know what the answer is myself) –  David Jul 8 '13 at 17:20
    
if you don't mind external lib. Try underscore.js uniq function. underscorejs.org/#uniq –  Chickenrice Jul 8 '13 at 17:22
    
@David, doesn't matter since I doubt the answer meets my criteria anyway. –  finishingmove Jul 8 '13 at 17:23
    
what if the original array contains an object with "count" greater than 1? –  גלעד ברקן Jul 8 '13 at 22:21
    
@groovy It won't. In fact, it is without count initially. –  finishingmove Jul 9 '13 at 4:17

4 Answers 4

Just a function if you would like to use.

function merge(arr) {    
   for(var o = {}, i; i=arr.shift(); o[i.name] = i.count + (o[i.name] || 0));
   for(i in o) arr.push({name:i, count:o[i]});
}

Calling :

var myArray = [{"name":"Kirk","count":1},
               {"name":"Spock","count":1},
               {"name":"Kirk","count":1}];

merge(myArray);   

// myArray is now :  [{"name":"Kirk","count":2}, {"name":"Spock","count":1}]
share|improve this answer
    
Not exactly what I was hoping for, but an interesting solution. –  finishingmove Jul 8 '13 at 18:07
    
Very neat trick, won't work for an object with more than 2 properties. –  Shiala May 20 '14 at 21:54

I think the best way would be to hash each object if it does not already exist, and delete the ones that you found already hashed in your structure. This way, you'd be checking the existence of each object only 1 (depends on your hash scheme).

share|improve this answer

You can use reduce which is actually a fold.

a.reduce(function(p, c) {
        var n = c.name;
        if (p[n])
            p[n].count++;
        else
            p[n] = c;
        return p;
    }, {})

will give you a object with "Kirk" and "Spock" as the key, what you want as values.

share|improve this answer
    
I actually want the output to be like in my example -- with name and count as the keys –  finishingmove Jul 8 '13 at 17:39

Try this better i'll useful resolve your issues

cleanup(arrayOfObj, 'name');

function cleanup(arr, prop) {
  var new_arr = [];
  var lookup = {};
  for (var i in arr) {
   lookup[arr[i][prop]] = arr[i];
  }
  for (i in lookup) {
   new_arr.push(lookup[i]); 
  }
  return new_arr;
}

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