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I have the following code:

public class DotLessFactory
{
    private LessEngine lessEngine;

    public virtual ILessEngine GetEngine()
    {
        return lessEngine ?? (lessEngine = CreateEngine());
    }

    private ILessEngine CreateEngine()
    {
        var configuration = new LessConfiguration();
        return new LessFactory().CreateEngine(configuration);
    }
}

Let's assume the following:

  1. I always want the same instance of ILessEngine to be returned.
  2. I use a DI container (I will use StructureMap for this example) to manage my objects.
  3. The lifetime of my objects will be Singleton because of assumption number 1.
  4. The code inside CreateEngine executes code that is referenced through a NuGet package.
  5. DotLess is a mere example. This code could be applicable to any similar NuGet package.

Approach 1

I register my objects with my DI container using:

For<DotLessFactory>().Singleton().Use<DotLessFactory>();
For<ILessEngine>().Singleton().Use(container => container.GetInstance<DotLessFactory>().GetEngine());
For<ISomeClass>().Singleton().Use<SomeClass>();

Now I can add ILessEngine to a constructor and have my container inject an instance of it as per the code below.

public class SomeClass : ISomeClass
{
    private ILessEngine lessEngine;

    public SomeClass(ILessEngine lessEngine)
    {
        this.lessEngine = lessEngine;
    }
}

Approach 2

Introduce an IDotLessFactory interface which exposes the GetEngine method. I register my objects with my DI container using:

For<IDotLessFactory>().Singleton().Use<DotLessFactory>();
For<ISomeClass>().Singleton().Use<SomeClass>();

Now my factory will create an instance of ILessEngine as per the code below.

public class SomeClass : ISomeClass
{
    private ILessEngine lessEngine;

    public SomeClass(IDotLessFactory factory)
    {
        Factory = factory;
    }

    public IDotLessFactory Factory { get; private set; }

    public ILessEngine LessEngine
    {
        get
        {
            return lessEngine ?? (lessEngine = Factory.GetEngine());
        }
    }
}

My questions are:

  1. What is the fundamental difference between Approach 1 and 2 when it comes to ILessEngine? In approach 1 the ILessEngine is managed by the container and in approach 2 it is not. What are the upside/downside to each approach? Is one approach better than the other?
  2. Do I need to use a synclock inside the CreateEngine method to ensure thread safety for any of the approaches? When should/shouldn't I use synclock in a scenario like this?
  3. I have seen examples where Activator.CreateInstance is used inside the CreateEngine method as opposed to newing up the object directly. Is there a reason one would use this approach? Has this something to do with not introducing direct dependencies in the factory object to objects inside the NuGet package?
  4. Let's assume the referenced NuGet package works with HttpContext under the hood. Would registering my factory in singleton scope have any negative effect on HttpContext or does that not matter since I assume the NuGet package most likely manages the scope of HttpContext itself?
  5. Finally, the DotLessFactory will eventually be used with Bundles (Microsoft.AspNet.Web.Optimization NuGet package) and the Bundle is only instantiated (not managed by container) on Application Start. The Bundle will depend on an injected instance of DotLessFactory. Does this fact make any difference to the questions above?

Any feedback would be extremely helpful.

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1 Answer 1

It's non-trivial to answer these questions specifically, but allow me to provide some non-exhaustive comments:

  1. As far as I can tell, none of the approaches guarantee requirement #1 (singleton). This is because two threads could perform a look-up at the same time and both evaluate lessEngine to null and trigger the creation of a new instance. The first approach may end up being thread safe if StructureMap lookups are thread safe, but I'd be surprised if this was the case (and regardless, you do not want your code to depend on an implementation "detail" in a 3rd party library).

  2. Both solutions make the same mistake, which is essentially checking whether an instance has already been created without protecting the entire code region. To solve the problem, introduce a private object variable to lock on, and protect the code region creating the instance:

    private object engineLock = new object();
    
    public virtual ILessEngine GetEngine()
    {
        lock( engineLock ) { return lessEngine ?? (lessEngine = CreateEngine()); }
    }
    

    As an aside, this would not be necessary if you could make StructureMap handle construction of the entire object chain, as it would then be up to StructureMap to ensure the singleton requirement as per your configuration of the container.

  3. You can only new objects if you know they have a default constructor (e.g. through a generic constraint in the code for a type parameter) or you have a compile-time reference to them. Since an IoC mostly creates things it didn't know about at compile time, and it often needs to pass parameters when doing so, Activator.CreateInstance is used istead. As far as I know, using "new" generates IL to invoke Activator.CreateInstance, so the end result is all the same.

  4. The lifetime of HttpContext is managed outside of your application (by ASP.NET) and so there is no scoping issue. HttpContext.Current will either be set or not, and if it isn't then you're doing work too early for it to be available (or executing in a context where it is never going to be available, e.g. outside ASP.NET).

  5. Uh, not sure what potential problem you're considering here, but my best guess is that it shouldn't have any effect on your code.

Hope this helps!

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