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Here's my program. There are seven employees for which I am creating a paystub. I am trying to achieve a loop where it starts at num = 1 and go all the way through num = 7. When I run the program, however, nothing gets printed. Thoughts?

#initalize all variables
medPremiere = 400
fedRate = .20
stateRate = .05
FICA = .08
retirement = .06
**Tax rates and such**


#the processing module
num = 1
while num < 8:
    if num ==1:
        empNum = 1
        empName = 'billybob'
        hours = 40
        rate = 50
        num = num + 1

    if num ==2:
        empNum = 2
        empName = 'superman'
        hours = 55
        rate = 40
        num = num + 1

    if num ==3:
        empNum = 3
        empName = 'hulk'
        hours = 60
        rate = 60
        num = num + 1

    if num ==4:
        empNum = 4
        empName = 'scoobie'
        hours = 45
        rate = 80
        num = num + 1

    if num ==5:
        empNum = 5
        empName = 'Sherry'
        hours = 66
        rate = 30
        num = num + 1

    if num ==6:
        empNum  = 6
        empName = 'doctor'
        hours = 88
        rate = 90
        num = num + 1

    if num ==7:
        empNum = 7
        empName = 'ironman'
        hours = 77
        rate = 70
        num = num + 1

These are 7 different employees for which I have to create paystubs for #the calc module

        #calculate gross pay
    num ==1
while num < 8:
        They get payed overtime and double overtime so I have to account for how many hours each employee has worked. Less than 41 hours they get payed regular, 41-60 hours they get paid overtime and more than 61 hours they get payed double overtime.
    if hours <41:
            gross = rate*hours
            fedTax = gross*fedRate
            stateTax = gross*stateRate
            F = gross*FICA
            K = gross*retirement
            netPay = gross - fedTax - stateTax - F - K - medPremiere
            print('Gross pay: ', gross)
            print('Federal tax @ 20%: ', fedTax)
            print('State tax @ 5%: ', stateTax)
            print('FICA @ 8%: ', F)
            print('401K @ 6%: ', K)
            print('Net pay: $', netPay)
            num = num + 1

Here I'm trying to make it go back to the list of numbers at the top and pull the information for the next employee.

        if hours < 61:
            gross = (40*hours) + (hours - 40)(1.5)(rate)
            fedTax = gross*fedRate
            stateTax = gross*stateRate
            F = gross*FICA
            K = gross*retirement
            netPay = gross - fedTax - stateTax - F - K - medPremiere
            print('Gross pay: ', gross)
            print('Federal tax @ 20%: ', fedTax)
            print('State tax @ 5%: ', stateTax)
            print('FICA @ 8%: ', F)
            print('401K @ 6%: ', K)
            print('Net pay: $', netPay)

            num = num + 1


        if hours > 61:
            gross = 40*hours + (hours-40)(1.5)(rate) + (hours - 60)(2)(rate)
            fedTax = gross*fedRate
            stateTax = gross*stateRate
            F = gross*FICA
            K = gross*retirement
            netPay = gross - fedTax - stateTax - F - K - medPremiere
            print('Gross pay: ', gross)
            print('Federal tax @ 20%: ', fedTax)
            print('State tax @ 5%: ', stateTax)
            print('FICA @ 8%: ', F)
            print('401K @ 6%: ', K)
            print('Net pay: $', netPay)
            num = num + 1
            break 

Is the calc module properly formatted, or is there a better way to go about this?

share|improve this question
    
A little out of topic: for financial data use Decimal instead of float. – spinus Jul 8 '13 at 17:37
1  
This program can't possibly do anything useful with employees 1-6. You do the first loop 7 times, doing nothing but rebinding the same variables each time; at the end, you've got the variables set for employee 7. Then you loop again, using employee 7's values 7 times. – abarnert Jul 8 '13 at 17:43
    
Also, if what you've pasted is your actual code, all of the hours tests after the first are inside the hours < 41 code. Since employee 7 has hours = 77, you'll never get into that code, and therefore nothing will ever happen. – abarnert Jul 8 '13 at 17:44
    
Some elif statements would probably help – fvrghl Jul 8 '13 at 17:50
1  
The lack of containing data structures and the amount of excessive, repetitive code is horrifying. – Rushy Panchal Jul 8 '13 at 17:52

Above the line with while num < 8: you say num ==1. This instead should be num = 1, and should be put inline with the while statement like so:

num = 1
while num < 8:

That's why none of the print statements execute; because num is not being reset to be less than 8.

share|improve this answer
    
those are the worst mistakes, you never catch them until someone else points them out – Tall Paul Jul 8 '13 at 17:39
    
Thanks for catching that. Changed it to num = 1, but it's still not printing – Sherry Yu Jul 8 '13 at 17:43
    
It should be inline with the while num < 8 statement. – fvrghl Jul 8 '13 at 17:46
    
Thanks, I fixed that. Now it is giving me an error: line 100, in <module> gross = 40*hours + (hours-40)(1.5)(rate) + (hours - 60)(2)(rate) TypeError: 'int' object is not callable – Sherry Yu Jul 8 '13 at 17:53
    
You can't do multiplication like that in python. Change all the (x)(y) statements to x*y – fvrghl Jul 8 '13 at 17:56

Also, a stylistic point that can help you avoid errors (and it does the dirty work of initializing and incrementing counter vars for you), you can do this:

for num in range(1,8):
   ...
   print num
   ...
share|improve this answer

This code can't possibly work as intended. You go over the first loop 7 times, rebinding the same variables and doing nothing else. At the end of that, you've got employee 7's values. Then you go over the second loop 7 times, using employee 7's values each time. (Then, because your indentation is incorrect, you don't do anything for an employee with >= 41 hours, so you do nothing 7 times.)

This is a very awkward way to structure your program, and it will be a lot easier to fix it if you restructure it.


First, if you want to loop over all of the numbers in [1, 8), use a for loop:

for num in range(1, 8):

This removes a whole lot of lines of extra code where you could get things wrong—including the one you actually did get wrong.


Next, you need to actually do something for each employee. While you could move the first loop into a function and put a yield empNum, empName, hours, rate, num after each one, this is making things far more complicated than they need to be. What you want is a function that can be called with a number and just return the right values for that number. Then you don't need a loop here at all.

But that function is already written for you, if you use the right data structure: it's just indexing.

For example, if you replace the first loop with this:

employees = {}
employees[1] = dict(empNum = 1, 
                    empName = 'billybob',
                    hours = 40,
                    rate = 50)
employees[2] = dict(empNum = 2,
# etc.

… then the second loop can just do this:

for employee in employees.values():
    if employee['hours'] < 41:
        gross = employee['rate'] * employee['hours']
        fedTax = gross*fedRate
        stateTax = gross*stateRate
        F = gross*FICA
        K = gross*retirement
        netPay = gross - fedTax - stateTax - F - K - medPremiere
        print('Gross pay: ', gross)
        print('Federal tax @ 20%: ', fedTax)
        print('State tax @ 5%: ', stateTax)
        print('FICA @ 8%: ', F)
        print('401K @ 6%: ', K)
        print('Net pay: $', netPay)
    if employee['hours'] < 61:
        # ...

But note that you're not actually using the keys for anything, so you must as well just use a list instead of a dict. (That way you also guarantee that you always iterate the employees in the same order you create them.) For example:

employees = [
    dict(empNum = 1, 
         empName = 'billybob',
         hours = 40,
         rate = 50),
    dict(empNum = 2,
         # etc.

And now, you don't need for employee in employees.values():, just for employee in employees:.


Meanwhile, the indentation problem wouldn't be possible if you used elif and else. In this code:

if employee['hours'] < 41:
    gross = employee['rate'] * employee['hours']
    # ... a bunch more code
    if employee['hours'] < 61:
        gross = employee['rate'] * employee['hours']
        # ... a bunch more code
    if employee['hours'] > 61:
        gross = employee['rate'] * employee['hours']

… everything compiles and runs, but you can never get into the last block, because hours can't be less than 41 and also be more than 60. But in this code:

if employee['hours'] < 41:
    gross = employee['rate'] * employee['hours']
    # ... a bunch more code
    elif employee['hours'] < 61:
        gross = employee['rate'] * employee['hours']
        # ... a bunch more code
    elif employee['hours'] > 61:
        gross = employee['rate'] * employee['hours']

You will get a SyntaxError if you get the indentation wrong, because there's no if at the same level as the elif, which is easier to debug.


Next, note that 61 is not less than 41, or less than 61, or greater than 61, so nothing will happen for anyone who works 61 hours. You could fix that by using >= 61 for the last check. Or, even more simply, just using else instead of elif.


Next, whenever you write the same line of code more than twice, you should look for a way to refactor it. Almost all of the details are identical between the three cases; only the first line is different. Besides being harder to read, repetitive code is also harder to get right, and harder to maintain. For example, at some point, you're going to have a bug, and fix it in one copy but not the other two.


Also, you can't multiply two numbers in Python by adjoining them; you need to use the * operator, like this:

gross = 40*hours + (hours - 40) * 1.5 * rate + (hours - 60) * 2 * rate

Finally, your equations are wrong. If someone works 50 hours, you're going to pay them 40 hours at $1/hour because you forgot to multiply the first term by rate, and then you're going to pay them an extra 150% for the next 15 hours instead of an extra 50%.


Putting it all together, replace the first loop with the list of dictionaries above, then replace the second loop with this:

for employee in employees:
    gross = rate * hours
    if hours > 40:
        gross += rate * (hours - 40) * 0.5 * rate
        if hours > 60:
            gross += rate * (hours - 60) * 0.5 * rate
    fedTax = gross*fedRate
    stateTax = gross*stateRate
    F = gross*FICA
    K = gross*retirement
    netPay = gross - fedTax - stateTax - F - K - medPremiere
    print('Gross pay: ', gross)
    print('Federal tax @ 20%: ', fedTax)
    print('State tax @ 5%: ', stateTax)
    print('FICA @ 8%: ', F)
    print('401K @ 6%: ', K)
    print('Net pay: $', netPay)

And that's your whole program.

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