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The zero-crossing rate is the rate of sign-changes along a signal, i.e., the rate at which the signal changes from positive to negative or back.

The zero-crossing rate Zn can be used to:

1-Distinguish voiced/unvoiced speech 2-Seperate unvoiced speech from static background noise.

It is a simple (yet effective) way to distinguish between voiced and unvoiced speech regions:

 • Voiced region:  lower zero-crossing rate 
 • Unvoiced region:  higher zero-crossing rate 

and here is the code i am using:

        public double evaluate(){
            int numZC=0;
            int size=signals.length;

            for (int i=0; i<size-1; i++){
                    if((signals[i]>=0 && signals[i+1]<0) || (signals[i]<0 && signals[i+1]>=0)){
                            numZC++;
                    }
            }                       

            return numZC/lengthInSecond;
        }

MY questions are:

1- My goal of using zero crossing is to eliminate the unvoiced part of the signal,,, and this code gives back the ZERO-CROSSING RATE. SO how will i do that?!

2- How will i know how much is a "low" zero-crossing rate and how much is a "high" zero-crossing rate???

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This is not related to programming, but with signal concepts. Better go to dsp.stackexchange.com –  leonbloy Jul 8 '13 at 18:55
    
no,, my problem is actually the programming part! that's why i posted it here! @leonbloy –  hana Jul 8 '13 at 19:05
    
Out of curiosity have you a link to research detailing how the zero crossing rate can be used to distinguish between voiced and un-voiced sound? –  Shannon Jul 9 '13 at 6:20
    
Depending on your ultimate goal How to automatically silence sections of audio below a given volume threshold? may have some useful information. –  Shannon Jul 9 '13 at 6:30
    
Pardon my curiosity, but WHAT is voiced-speech? –  Daniel Mošmondor Jul 30 '13 at 19:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The fundamental problem is that while you've found a way to calculate the zero crossing rate of a block of samples, you can't use that to distinguish sounds within that block because it only gives you one number that describes your entire block.

One potential solution is to divide your big block into small blocks, and then work on those. If you do that, you will soon find that your small blocks, which you made arbitrarily, don't fit into neat categories of voiced and unvoiced, and simply removing one block or setting a block's volume to zero will leave you with "choppy" sounds or even harsh clicking sounds, and won't divide the parts of speech as cleanly as you like.

This may be a worthwhile point to start with, because it's closer to your existing code, but it won't work out in the long run, unless you are just looking to do something rough (in which case, this might be good enough!).

To resolve this, you may want to consider calculating an "instantaneous zero crossing rate"1 that updates the Zr for each sample.

  1. My goal of using zero crossing is to eliminate the unvoiced part of the signal,,, and this code gives back the ZERO-CROSSING RATE. SO how will i do that?! It's not clear what you want. What do you mean by "eliminate"? Do you want silence or do you want to skip those sections? For silence, simply replace the unwanted sections with zero. To skip, simply remove those samples. Of course, you will still end up with clicks and pops, but I assume you know how to get rid of that. If not, maybe you can read up on linear interpolation. Keep in mind that you will almost certainly have to apply some heuristics like "don't remove any sections that are smaller than n samples".

  2. How will i know how much is a "low" zero-crossing rate and how much is a "high" zero-crossing rate??? I would guess a good threshold will be roughly around 400Hz, but speech is not my specialty. Moreover it will vary a bit by speaker and possibly by language and other factors. I suggest you make some samples and see for yourself.

1 this name is a bit misleading and you could say "there's no such thing as an instantaneous zero crossing rate". I'm not here to argue that; rather I want to use that phrase because it expresses what I mean and I hope you understand it. Suffice it to say you should do your best to update Zr as often as you can. eg. something like this:

int lastSign = 0;
int lastCrossing = 0;
float nextZeroCrossing( float newSample ) {
   int thisSign = newSample > 0 ? 1 : -1 ;
   if( thisSign != lastSign ) {
      lastSign = thisSign;
      //zero crossing has happened. Update our estimate of Zr using lastCrossing and return that
   } else {
      ++lastCrossing;
      //zero crossing has not happened. Return existing Zr
   }
}

You may want to "smooth" the output of nextZeroCrossing(), as it will tend to jump around a lot. A simple exponential or moving average filter will work great.

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