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good after noon programmers,hope are happy this is the code :

    #include<iostream.h>


void sum(int &a[])
{
         a[2] = a[1] +a[0];
         }


int main()
{
    int a[3]={4,2,0};
    sum(a);
    cout<<a[2]<<endl;
}

my compiler say : "declaration of 'a' as array of references" and: "`a' undeclared (first use this function) " how i can fix that ? i have a bigger code but i want to know how to put array with reference in function i think it's problem in syntax and i don't know where i find the solution so i come here i search a lot on internet but i don't know how i search right for my problem solution

the original code :

  void Jump(int &y,int &y0, float V0 ,float &time, int &ground , int radius , int thickness_of_ground ,bool &protect_from_jump ,bool &ready_for_jump , bool (&key)[5])
  {
      int SPACE=4;
      float a_y=9.8;
      int FPS =60;

  if (protect_from_jump) key[SPACE]=false;

  if(!key[SPACE] && ground-(radius+thickness_of_ground)-y>0)
   {              
                  V0=0;
                  y=int(0.5*a_y*time*time -V0*time + y0);
                  time +=6.0/FPS;
                  protect_from_jump=true;
                  }
                  else if (!key[SPACE] &&  ground-(radius+thickness_of_ground)-y<=0)
                  {

                      y=ground -(radius+thickness_of_ground);
                      y0=y;
                      time=0;
                      protect_from_jump=false;

                  }

  if(key[SPACE])
  {
                if (ready_for_jump)
                {
                y0=y;
                ready_for_jump = false;
                }
              V0=40;  
              y=int(0.5*a_y*time*time -V0*time + y0);
              time +=6.0/FPS;

              if(ground-(radius+thickness_of_ground)+1-y<=0)
              {
              ready_for_jump=true;
              y=ground-(radius+thickness_of_ground);
              y0=y;
              time=0;
              key[SPACE]=false;
              }
                } 

}

share|improve this question
1  
When you pass an array to a function, it automatically decays to a pointer to the first element. You don't need to use a reference to modify the array contents. –  Barmar Jul 8 '13 at 18:31
    
Wow. <iostream.h> hasn't been a good idea for 15 years now. Use <iostream>. –  aschepler Jul 8 '13 at 20:54
    
Upvoted for actually reproducing your problem in a small sample. –  Puppy Oct 20 '13 at 12:01
    
thank you I appreciate this:D –  Hassan Kanso Oct 20 '13 at 12:30
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Are you really trying to declare an array of references? If so, then you just can't.

If, however, you want to declare a reference to an array (which again I don't see the reason for in this particular case), then you have to parenthesize it because [] has higher precedence than &. Furthermore, in that case, you have to give a dimension to your array else it's a compiler error:

void sum(int (&a)[10])
{
    // do stuff
}
share|improve this answer
    
it's work thank you , i just trying to learn c++ from internet so i don't know so much the definition of language syntax , and i use this example (in top) just because to make focus to the important , and the real code is for jump function i will add it in original question –  Hassan Kanso Jul 8 '13 at 20:47
    
@user2561855 I learned C++ in an autodidactic way too... –  user529758 Jul 8 '13 at 20:48
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