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I like the new pointer types in C++11, but sometimes I still need a raw pointer. Something that makes me increasingly sad about "raw" types in C++, however, is their habit of initializing as undefined when not given an explicit value. As I use std::shared_ptr<> and the like more often, this need to initialize raw pointers to null feels increasingly brittle and unnecessary. I'm talking about:

class foo
{
    ...
    std::shared_ptr< bar > pb;   // Initially null in whatever constructor.
    std::unique_ptr< dar > pd;   // Likewise.
    std::weak_ptr< gar > pg;     // And again.
    lar* pr;                     // Uh-oh! Who knows what this is? Better remember to initialize...
};

foo::foo( int j )
: pr( nullptr )
{...}

foo::foo( const string& s )
: pr( nullptr )
{...}

... etc.: many tedious and error-prone constructor definitions follow.

What I'd like, therefore, is a "raw pointer with null initialization." Something like:

class foo
{
    ...
    std::shared_ptr< bar > pb;   // Initially null in whatever constructor.
    std::unique_ptr< dar > pd;   // Likewise.
    std::weak_ptr< gar > pg;     // And again.
    raw_ptr< lar > pr;           // Once more with feeling.
};

foo::foo( int j )
{...}                            // No explicit pointer initialization necessary.

foo::foo( const string& s )
{...}

...

More precisely, what I want is a simple, cheap type that acts exactly like a raw pointer in every way except that its default constructor initializes it to nullptr.

My question: (1) Does such a thing already exist in the standard library? (2) If not, what would be the most elegant/smallest way to accomplish an implementation of this type?

P.S. I'm not interested in Boost or any other libraries, unless perhaps it is a header-only library in a single file. Smallness and simplicity are of the essence.

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8  
You could just initialize it in the class: lar *pr{};. –  chris Jul 8 '13 at 19:15
1  
@OldPeculier: Compilers can usually warn you about non-initialized members, so this is moderately easy to patrol... but you're right in general, of course. I suppose classes shouldn't grow that much, because that's a symptom of mixing responsibilities. In particular, if a class contains raw pointers, it probably shouldn't have many other concerns. –  Kerrek SB Jul 8 '13 at 19:21
3  
This looks like a how do you make the best use of the wrong tool? type of question. First you need to clarify why the solution to your real problem is using a raw pointer. Unless that is justified, considering the fragility of not initializing it is a non question. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 8 '13 at 19:22
4  
@OldPeculier: On the contrary, raw pointers should be the exception and being the exception should be in use in only a few components that need to be treated with extra care. If you are dealing with this type of special components and you are really paying extra care chances are that you will not forget initialization. The problem comes when you decide that raw pointers are common and, used to them, you become more careless. In a world were raw pointers are rare, code with raw pointers is already suspicious and less likely to have errors that bypass review. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 8 '13 at 19:37
3  
@jmucchiello Good grief. Is a question like this really the right place to discuss the philosophy of software design and C++ usage? People use C++ in all sorts of ways. Live and let live! Please, just assume for the purposes of this question that some C++ programmers sometimes have good reasons to use raw pointers and to want them automatically nulled without recourse to in-class or in-constructor initialization. –  OldPeculier Jul 8 '13 at 21:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It looks like you need "World’s Dumbest Smart Pointer" which has been proposed as an addition to a future C++ standard template library. You can see the proposal here: "A Proposal for the World’s Dumbest Smart Pointer" and here: "A Proposal for the World’s Dumbest Smart Pointer, v2" and here: "A Proposal for the World’s Dumbest Smart Pointer, v3"

The proposal contains a potential partial implementation which you may be able to adapt for use with the compiler you are currently using. The implementation is similar to the almost_raw_ptr solution provided by Mark Ransom. A web search for exempt_ptr will give more details.

A proposal for the World’s Dumbest Smart Pointer, v3 has "Renamed exempt_ptr to observer_ptr" see the linked doument for other changes.

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Even better than Mark Ransom's excellent answer, this exactly expresses the need I'm highlighting, discusses a variety of clever potential solutions, and outlines a strong one. Thank you. –  OldPeculier Jul 9 '13 at 1:48
1  
I don't see the need for a dumb pointer, we can simply use std::reference_wrapper, which is basically the same thing. –  Mooing Duck Aug 29 '13 at 17:22
1  
The exempt_ptr proposal supports storing nullptr and has a default constructor which allows it to fullfill use cases that std::reference_wrapper cannot. –  ChetS Aug 30 '13 at 20:35

C++11 allows in class initialization of data members.

class foo
{
  // ...
  lar *pr = nullptr;
};

That'll always initialize pr to nullptr unless you assign another value in the constructor.

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Yes. It doesn't help in my particular case, but it's a valid answer. See chris's comment above with lar* pr{};—even tidier. –  OldPeculier Jul 8 '13 at 19:22
    
@OldPeculier Why doesn't it help in your case? –  Praetorian Jul 8 '13 at 19:23
    
Well, it solves the DRY problem, where you only need to say nullptr once, at the declaration, rather than repeating it in every constructor. It just doesn't solve you not needing to say it at all. –  Joe Z Jul 8 '13 at 19:24
1  
@OldPeculier I'll have to take your word on that one. Irrespective of what these raw pointers are being used for, if they truly are declared as data members of pointer type, I don't get why it's difficult to initialize them to some value. –  Praetorian Jul 8 '13 at 19:39
1  
@OldPeculier, Remove the C++11 tag from the question and I'll agree with you 100%. All compliant C++11 toolchains work with this answer. –  jmucchiello Jul 9 '13 at 0:52
template<typename T>
class almost_raw_ptr
{
public:
    almost_raw_ptr(T* p = nullptr) : m_p(p) {}
    T* operator=(T* p) { m_p = p; return p; }
    operator T*() const { return m_p; }
    T* operator->() const { return m_p; }
    T& operator*() const { return *m_p; }
    T& operator[](int i) const { return m_p[i]; }

private:
    T* m_p;
};

This won't work if you need a pointer or a reference to the actual raw pointer, but it should work for everything else.

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3  
an almost_good_answer –  Walter Jul 8 '13 at 19:21
    
Nope. Needs comparison operators, copy constructors, and lots of other cruft if we're going to go down that road. –  OldPeculier Jul 8 '13 at 19:21
    
Yeah, I imagine things get even more exciting if you want to do pointer arithmetic on one of these things, too. –  Joe Z Jul 8 '13 at 19:23
2  
@OldPeculier, the automatic conversions to/from raw pointers will cover most needs for comparisons and copies. –  Mark Ransom Jul 8 '13 at 19:29
2  
@jmucchiello, the overhead will be no worse than any other smart pointer type. Inline expansion isn't guaranteed but the standard library templates depend on it for acceptable performance and this template is no different. Look into the definition of std::vector and tell me what you find for operator[]. –  Mark Ransom Jul 8 '13 at 21:15

When you use a raw pointer and expect the value 0 to express that the pointer is not yet initialized, the value 0 is in a sense a "sentinel value", or a "magic cookie." Think of a magic cookie as a special value that indicates state, but is otherwise indistinguishable from normal, valid values for that datatype.

Magic cookies being Bad for all the usual reasons might be triggering your sense that this is brittle and ultimately not needed. A solution that doesn't use a sentinel value might feel better.

One such solution is to use boost::optional:

typedef Foo* FooPtr;
boost::optional <FooPtr> foo;
// ...
if (!foo)
{
  // the pointer is not yet initialized
} 
else
{
  // the pointer IS initialized
  Foo* theFoo = *foo;
}

Initializing the pointer is simple:

foo = new Foo;

optional is not a sentinel value because you do not store a special value of Foo* to indicate that the pointer isn't initialized. The only job that optional does is to say "yes" or "no" in answer to the question "is the pointer initialized?"

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