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Let's take the example code below:

always @(posedge clock)
   begin
   if (reset == 1)
     begin
        something <= 0
     end
   end

Now let's say reset changes from 0 to 1 at the same time there's a posedge for the clock. Will something <= 0 at that point? Or will that happen the next time there's a posedge for the clock (assuming reset stays at 1)?

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It depends on exactly how reset is driven.

If reset and something are both triggered off the same clock, then something will go to 0 one clock cycle after reset goes to 1. For example:

always @(posedge clock)
   begin
   if (somethingelse)
     begin
        reset <= 1;
     end
   end
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@user2548255: this doesn't answer your question. Did you mean "at the same time" or not? If you did, then it doesn't matter how reset was driven. If not, then you should edit your question. –  EML Jul 10 '13 at 8:02
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If reset is synchronous and based on clock, The simulatore will defiantly see reset on the next clock and not the current. Physical design has clock-to-Q, therefor a rise in reset will not be observed in the same clock that caused it. You may see reset at the same time as clock in waveform. reset <= 1'b1; make the assignment happen near the end of the scheduler (after all code has executed).

To not have to worry about this when looking at a waveform, some logic designers like to put a delay on the assignment creating an artificial clock-to-Q delay (ex reset <= #1 1'b1; and something <=#1 0;). Synthesis tools will ignore the delay, but some will give warnings. That warning can be avoided by using a macro.

`ifdef SYNTHESIS
`define Q   /* blank */
`else
`define Q #1
`endif
...
reset <= `Q 1'b1;
...
something <=`Q 1'b1;
...

If reset is asynchronous and being use with synchronous reset, setup time requirements need to be respected. In simulation if clock and reset rise at the same time, it is up to your verilog scheduler to decide if reset will be the new value or old value. Usually it will take the left-hand side value (old value), which means the reset will be missed on the current clock. Physical design uncertainly as well with a meta-stability risk.

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The code you have written infers a flip-flop with synchronous reset. This means it is assumed that the "reset" signal is synchronised to the "clock" domain before being used in this way. If the "reset" signal is not synchronised then you should modify the code to infer a flip-flop with asynchronous reset as below:

always@(posedge clock or posedge reset)
begin
  if (reset)
    something <= 0
  else 
    something <= something_else
end

Coming back to your question and assuming the code you have written is what you want, the outcome depends on how the reset is driven. If it is synchronous then the simulator will see it in the next clock edge. If it is asynchronous then the simulator can assume anything, it can vary from simulator to simulator. Please note that in simulator everything is a sequence of events and there is no such thing as happening at the same time.

In the physical world, what you have coded will result in a flip-flop with reset signal being one of the inputs to the combo driving the input of this flop. Now if the reset is synchronous, you are guaranteed that there will be no setup or hold violation at this flop. Whether the flop will 'see' the reset in this clock or the next depends on the various delays of the synthesised circuit (Usually this is the main reason that the reset is always held for few clock cycles to make sure all the flops in your design sees the reset). If reset is asynchronous then the flop will go into a metastable state. You will never want this in your design. Hope this clarifies.

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The short answer is that either of your two outcomes (immediately, or next cycle) could happen. This is a standard race condition, and simulators are free to handle this any way they want; some will give one answer, and others will give the other one.

For the long answer, look up any introductory text on how VHDL delta cycles work. Verilog doesn't specify 'delta cycles', but any Verilog simulator will work in exactly the same way, with some (irrelevant) changes in the overall scheduling algorithm. In this case, the scheduler finds that it has two events on the queue in a specific delta - reset rising, and clock rising. This is what "at the same time" means. It chooses one in an unspecified way (it might be earlier in the text source, or later, for example), works through all changes associated with that edge, and then goes back and works through all changes associated with the other edge.

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