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Consider the below case

Case 1: 
action#1
volatile read var  1
volatile write var 1
volatile read var  2 
volatile write var 2 
action#2

What can we say about reordering of action#1 with action#2 for case 1 above

Case 2:
action#1
synchronized(new Object()){}
synchronized(new Object()){}
action#2

What can we say about reordering of action#1 with action#2 for case 2 above.

For case 2 i already have the answer from question Is this a better version of Double Check Locking without volatile and synchronization overhead .The answer of this Question says that case 2 reordering is possible between action#2 and action#1 because JMM is a weaker model than Roach Motel Model. for which i think zhong.j.yu is right.

But now i got something contradictory from the answer of the following question Valid reorderings - under new JMM. Which shows a little strict Roach motel Model.

  For Orignal Code

     instanceVar1 = value ;//  normal read operation, no volatile
     synchronized(this) {
       instanceVar2 = value2; //normal read operation, no volatile   
     }
     instanceVar3 = value3;  //normal read operation, no volatile 

The below Ordering is not possible

Case 4: 

    instanceVar3 = value3;  //normal read operation, no volatile
    synchronized(this) {
       instanceVar2 = value2; //normal read operation, no volatile   
     }
    instanceVar1 = value ;//  normal read operation, no volatile

This also follows from the jeremy manson blog post http://jeremymanson.blogspot.co.uk/2007/05/roach-motels-and-java-memory-model.html

Also i want to point the that compiler is restricted while optimizing code which involves memory barrier. See: http://jeremymanson.blogspot.in/2009/06/volatile-arrays-in-java.html Where ** arr=arr a redundant read and write are not optimized because arr is a volatile reference**.

What i want to say both the answers of Questions are little contradictory in nature and both seems to be right. Question 1: Valid reorderings - under new JMM Question 2: Is this a better version of Double Check Locking without volatile and synchronization overhead

How we will decide at which Point JMM is weaker than Roach Motel Model?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Question 1:

Another good point of reference is the Reodering Grid (I often reference here). What it says that is useful here is that a NormalLoad followed by a MonitorExit can not be reordered. In this case the normal load of instanceVar1 = value ; cannot be re ordered wrt to the monitor exit of synchronized(this) {

Question 2:

On the face it does appear to contradict. But what it really is saying, is that because there are no other threads that can synchronize with an object (since you are doing new Object) then it stands to reason that there is no need to worry about multithreading and thus is able to remove and reorder around the synchronized methods.

This is based off the ideas behind Lock Elision.


The volatile self referencing read/write - as far as I know there is no dead code removal for a volatile store even if it is with store of itself, and so the compiler still needs to respect the ordering rules for volatile stores.

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thanks @John. So if i conclude the case 1 above will actually prevent reordering of action#1 and action#2 am i right ? –  veritas Jul 9 '13 at 3:09
    
@veritas Yes, because (as mentioned in the grid) a VolatileLoad cannot be reordered wrt to a NormalLoad or NormalStore. In case 1 volatile read var 1 satisfies this. –  John Vint Jul 9 '13 at 11:58
    
thanks very much –  veritas Jul 9 '13 at 12:47

I think you are coping with an overload of irrelevant information. For all practical purposes, the JMM is as strong as the Roach Motel model. A minor exception as in your Case 2 is there only because the locks are obviously impossible to be obtained by any other threads, so the whole synchronized block is just a balast. The JVM is allowed to pretend it never saw it.

What the JVM must guarantee is that all write actions preceding the write to a volatile in program order must be observable by another thread which has read the volatile value (an analogous guarantee holds for lock release/acquire actons, respectively). How this is ensured in practice is a minor detail except if you are a JIT compiler implementor.

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