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For a good long while I've been using a really nice column spanning method I stumbled across, wherein I can have a div with the class .boxcontainer and child .box elements, and using an :after pseudo-element on .boxcontainer, my .box columns justify nice and evenly across the page. Here are the all-important definitions:

.boxcontainer {
    text-align:                 justify;
    -ms-text-justify:           distribute-all-lines;
    text-justify:               distribute-all-lines;
    background-color:             orange;
}

.boxcontainer:after {
    content:                    '';
    display:                    inline-block;
    width:                      100%;
    height:                     0px;
    font-size:                  0px;
    line-height:                0px;
}

Most of my previous projects have been XHTML1 Transitional (which I have subsequently learned uses a limited quirks mode when compared to other DTDs), and using this method in XHTML1 the parent .boxcontainer always wrapped perfectly flush around the child .box elements.

However, working on a new project in HTML5, I've discovered that there appears to be an extra line added underneath the justified .box elements. You can see an example here: http://jsfiddle.net/RZQTM/1/ - click on Fiddle Options and change the DTD to just about anything else and you'll see what I mean - an orange 'band' appears underneath the justified blue boxes.

I think this is down to something in the :after pseudo-element being rendered almost like an additional line of content, but I have no idea how to fix it. Any tips on how to remove the extra space under the boxes would be most gratefully received.

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

The trick i use to make this extra line to vanish is to apply line-height:0; on parent , and reset line-height to 1.2em or whatever line-hight you had setted. vertical-align:top;/* or bottom */ on :after elements ends up to swallow any vertical gaps left.

one exemple : http://codepen.io/gcyrillus/pen/dlvCp

share|improve this answer
    
This is a very useful trick especially if you absolutely need very clean mark-up with no extra elements. Setting an explicit value for the line-height requires some design attention but this is a very minor limitation. – Marc Audet Jul 8 '13 at 21:38
    
Having to add only a couple of lines of CSS makes this a winner in my book. Thanks, @GCyrillus. – indextwo Jul 9 '13 at 10:27

A work around with extra markup and using CSS table-cells

I sometimes use the following. In the HTML, I add an extra element div.spacer:

<div class="boxcontainer">
    <div class="box two">
         <h3>This is the title</h3>
            Lorem ipsum dolor amit ...</div>
    <div class="spacer"></div>
    <div class="box two">
         <h3>This is the title</h3>
            Lorem ipsum dolor amit ...</div>
    <div class="spacer"></div>
    <div class="box two">
         <h3>This is the title</h3>
            Lorem ipsum dolor amit ...</div>
    <div class="spacer"></div>
    <div class="box two">
         <h3>This is the title</h3>
            Lorem ipsum dolor amit ...</div>
</div>

For the CSS, I use display: table on the parent container and then display: table-cell on the .box child elements:

.boxcontainer {
    background-color: orange;
    display: table;
    width: 100%;
}
.box {
    vertical-align: top;
    display: table-cell;
    background-color: blue;
    color: white;
    font-family: Trebuchet MS;    
}

The demo fiddle is: http://jsfiddle.net/audetwebdesign/xWfk2/

Internally, the CSS re-purposes the .spacer as sibling table-cells and the default spacing tends to be even because the .box elements have a fixed width.

This approach is ideal if the .spacer elements serve a useful purpose (have real content) and if you have other reasons to use table-cells, say vertical positioning control and so on.

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