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For reference, I'm using Rust 0.7.

I'm trying to create a stack implementation using an owned linked list and I'm running into trouble.

trait Stack<T> {
    fn push(&mut self, item : T);
    fn pop(&mut self) -> Option<T>;
}

enum Chain<T> {
    Link(T, ~Chain<T>),
    Break
}

impl<T> Stack<T> for ~Chain<T> {
    fn push(&mut self, item : T) {
        *self = ~Link(item, *self);
    }
    fn pop(&mut self) -> Option<T> {
        None
    }
}

When I try to rustc stack.rs I get the following error:

stack.rs:13:28: 13:34 error: cannot move out of dereference of & pointer
stack.rs:13         *self = ~Link(item, *self);
                                        ^~~~~~

I don't know how I could overcome this or what I could do differently to allow this. It seems like I should be able to create this data structure without using managed pointers, but I haven't seen a lot of documentation on this sort of thing.

share|improve this question
1  
you should implement the trait on Chain<T> like the accepted answer, but you can retain your idea by using something like let tail = std::util::replace(self, Break); std::util::replace(self, Link(item, ~tail)); The replace and swap functions are important tools when working with owned datastructures. –  u0b34a0f6ae Jul 12 '13 at 13:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Either assignment from self (which I think includes constructing a new thing out of it, as in the case of Link(item, *self) implies a move. This means that in the process of constructing the new Link that self becomes unusable, because:

"After a value has been moved, it can no longer be used from the source location and will not be destroyed there."

The Right Way™ is probably best documented by what's done in this example in the stdlib. It's a doubly linked list, and it is managed, but it's mutable, and I hope copy free. There's also list of useful container types, too.

I did manage to get this immutable version of your datastructure working, however.

trait Stack<T> {
    fn push(self, item : T) -> Self;
    fn pop(self)            -> Option<(T, Self)>;
    fn new()                -> Self;
}

#[deriving(Eq, ToStr)]
enum Chain<T> {
    Link(T, ~Chain<T>),
    Break
}

impl<T> Stack<T> for Chain<T> {
    fn push(self, item : T) -> Chain<T> {
        Link(item, ~self)
    }
    fn pop(self)            -> Option<(T, Chain<T>)> {
        match self {
            Link(item, ~new_self) => Some((item, new_self)),
            Break                 => None
        }
    }
    fn new()                -> Chain<T> {
        Break
    }
}

fn main() {
    let b : ~Chain<int> = ~Stack::new();
    println(b.push(1).push(2).push(3).to_str());
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That's pretty good. I think if you changed pop to return (Self, Option<T>) it would be better, but that's a huge step in the right direction. Thanks a lot! –  Kyle Jul 9 '13 at 6:14
    
Suggestion taken. –  tehgeekmeister Jul 10 '13 at 2:17
3  
At this stage, you might as well make the option contain both results - they are always either both some or both none. –  Ramon Snir Jul 10 '13 at 5:24
    
I would, but at this point I'm done with the answer. I learned what I wanted to! –  tehgeekmeister Jul 10 '13 at 6:41
1  
In order to help the Rust community at large, I've updated the answer to include the suggestions Ramon Snir made. –  Kyle Jul 15 '13 at 17:41

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