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I am trying to setup a simple database in which I have a user and store both their residential and postal address. I have 2 tables

Users

id (Primary Key)    
name (Varchar 255)
residential_id (foreign key)
postal_id (foreign key)

Address

id (primary key)
type (enum of R and P)
street (varchar 255)
suburb (varchar 255)

I am tring to do an inner join so I end up with a result-set that looks like.

id - name - residential_street - residential_suburb, postal_street, postal_suburb

I keep getting null results for the address details, I assume this is because I am getting two sets of data from the address table and there is a conflict. Is it possible to return the address fields linked to the residential ID and the postal ID at the same time?

My SQL syntax is

SELECT * FROM users 
LEFT JOIN address
ON (users.residential_id = address.id AND users.postal_id = address.id)

EDIT. As has been pointed out my DB design is rather poor and I am looking to improve it. The key thing I am trying to achieve is that I can store the details of a person along with their associated residential and postal address. I will never be looking to expand the database to include a work address for example so hopefully that cuts down the complexity of the table.

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Please show some sample data. –  Asaph Nov 18 '09 at 4:10
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The following assumes that

  1. the "id" column in the address is the foreign key to the user table.
  2. there is an addressType column in the address table that distinguishes postal from residence

What you want is:

select 
  u.*, 
  res.street residential_street,
  res.suburb residential_suburb,
  pos.street postal_street,
  pos.suburb postal_suburb
from users u
    left join address res on u.id=res.id and res.addressType='R'
    left join address pos on u.id=pos.id and pos.addressType='P'

The key here is you have to join to the address table TWICE. The address type discriminator is needed so that each join selects only the appropriate type of address. If your schema is different, please clarify and I'll modify my answer.

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Yes, with the primary key to the Address table being (id,addressType). In the original it looked to me like the id in Address was being stored in the User.Residential or User.Postal fields which strikes me as a poor design. Adding a new WORK addr for example would mean changing the Users table. –  MadMurf Nov 18 '09 at 4:36
    
Murf and Jim, you are correct in that my initial design is poor at best so would be grateful for input into how I could make it better. –  uberweb Nov 18 '09 at 4:42
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You're checking if the column address is equal to an id, I don't think this will be true in any case.

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@Olafur: is that not the same as his one ? what is different ? –  RageZ Nov 18 '09 at 4:12
    
I've updated the answer. –  Ólafur Waage Nov 18 '09 at 4:13
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That's relatively easy. You just need to join to the address table twice.

SELECT u.id,
       u.name,
       ar.street residential_atreet,
       ar.suburb residential_suburb,
       ap.street postal_street,
       ap.suburb postal_suburb
FROM users u
LEFT JOIN address ar ON u.residential = ar.id
LEFT JOIN address ap ON u.postal = ap.id

This kind of data model is not one I personally favour. Instead I would suggest having an address type field and having a one-to-many relationship (user.id foreign key in address table).

One problem you'll face is that determining user ownership of addresses isn't strictly straightforward (in your model). Nor is finding orphaned addresses.

One suggestion: since residential and postal are foreign keys, try to name them as such (eg residential_id and postal_id) so it's clearer when reading the SQL.

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Your query is assuming I have a separate table for residential addresses and postal address. Actually I only have one with a type field that denotes whether it is residential or postal. But as I said in my edited questions I am currently looking into how I can better deisgn my (what should be a) relativly simple DB. –  uberweb Nov 18 '09 at 5:00
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@m3mbran3 my suggestion would be to dump the residential_id & postal_id fields from Users

Users

id (Primary Key)    
name (Varchar 255)

Address

id (if required, otherwise primary key is combo of userid,type)
user_id
type (enum of R and P)
street (varchar 255)
suburb (varchar 255)

Then you're back to

SELECT u.id,
       u.name,
       ar.street residential_street,
       ar.suburb residential_suburb,
       ap.street postal_street,
       ap.suburb postal_suburb
FROM users u
LEFT JOIN address ar 
           ON u.id = ar.user_id
           AND ar.type = 'R'
LEFT JOIN address ap 
           ON u.id = ap.user_id
           AND ap.type = 'P'

a variation of @Cletus suggestion. Remembering that if a user has a residential address and no postal address or vice/versa there may be nulls

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