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TFIDFVectorizer takes so much memory ,vectorizing 470 MB of 100k documents takes over 6 GB , if we go 21 million documents it will not fit 60 GB of RAM we have.

So we go for HashingVectorizer but still need to know how to distribute the hashing vectorizer.Fit and partial fit does nothing so how to work with Huge Corpus?

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up vote 7 down vote accepted

I would strongly recommend you to use the HashingVectorizer when fitting models on large dataset.

The HashingVectorizer is data independent, only the parameters from vectorizer.get_params() are important. Hence (un)pickling `HashingVectorizer instance should be very fast.

The vocabulary based vectorizers are better suited for exploratory analysis on small datasets.

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Verygood , i found this out : t.co/12cFDYlTil and testing. Can we use Unsupervised Learning (KMeans) ? –  V3ss0n Jul 9 '13 at 18:31
    
On TFIDFVectorizers we can use Randomized PCA for plotting , but HashingVectorizer output is different right? How can we do Scatterplot on that? –  V3ss0n Jul 9 '13 at 18:32
    
Why would it be different? RandomizedPCA can take any sparse matrix as input, what ever the way it was generated. –  ogrisel Jul 10 '13 at 8:31
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If you want to do out-of-core unsupervised learning (clustering) you should use MiniBatchKMeans instead of KMeans. Only the former has a partial_fit method. –  ogrisel Jul 10 '13 at 8:32
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HashingVectorizer does not do IDF weighting. That might be the cause of your problem. You could try to pipeline a TfidfTransformer to do the IDF re-weighting on the output of the HashingVectorizer manually. –  ogrisel Jul 10 '13 at 19:25

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