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Suppose I want to write a method in ruby whose last line is a method call but I do not want to return its return value. Is there a more elegant way to accomplish this other than adding a nil after the call?

def f(param)
    # some extra logic with param
    g(param) # I don't want to return the return of g
end
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2  
Perhaps you can identify the situation where not returning a value is a necessity? At the very least, you can ignore any return values. –  Jim Pedid Jul 8 '13 at 23:23
2  
@JimPedid Tim Holt's answer on this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/1023146/… for example, a case where an undocumented return value that is used elsewhere can cause problems if a method is modified. –  Ryan Haining Jul 9 '13 at 0:05
    
Ruby does have return you know... –  mu is too short Jul 9 '13 at 1:17
2  
I think he's suggesting to just call return (with not value) def method ... return end –  Jim Pedid Jul 9 '13 at 2:28
1  
@JimPedid: Right, just a plain return, a nice and explicit way to say that a method doesn't return anything of use. –  mu is too short Jul 9 '13 at 2:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want to make it "poke you in the eye" explicit, just say "this method doesn't return anything":

def f(param)
    # some extra logic with param
    g(param) # I don't want to return the return of g
    return
end

f(x) will still evaluate to nil but a bare return is an unambiguous way to say "this method doesn't return anything of interest", a trailing nil means that "this method explicitly returns nil" and that's not quite the same as not returning anything of use.

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No, but if it is important that f indeed returns nil, and not whatever g(param) returns, then nothing is more elegant than spelling that out with a nil on the last line. Why would you want to obfuscate this away? Most of the time, elegance is in the explicit and the obvious.

A few tenants from The Zen of Python come to mind:

Explicit is better than implicit.
Simple is better than complex.
Readability counts.

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1  
the zen of python has no bearing in these waters. after all, we're talking about implicitly returned values to begin with. I was looking for more of an explicit way to suppress g`s return rather than explicitly return nil. –  Ryan Haining Jul 8 '13 at 23:50
2  
We could all learn a thing or two from The Zen of Python. –  Robert Kajic Jul 8 '13 at 23:56
1  
@RyanHaining Why not? Just because it’s a underpinning of Pythonic philosophy doesn’t mean it’s not applicable/useful to other languages as well. Don’t cast it away simply because “Python“ is in the name and not Ruby. All but #13 are mostly applicable to any good code, IMO. –  Andrew Marshall Jul 9 '13 at 2:28
    
@AndrewMarshall in my fairly limited experience with Ruby, it's seemed like the idea of "Explicit is better than implicit" isn't as encouraged by the Ruby language. Am I wrong in feeling this way? –  Ryan Haining Jul 9 '13 at 18:58

No. If you want to return nil, the last expression has to evaluate to nil. You can do this with a terminating nil line or by surrounding the method body in nil.tap {} or however else you like, but it's pretty straightforward — the last expression evaluated gets returned.

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As the others have said, no. However, if you want to avoid adding another line, you have a couple of options:

g(param); nil
g(param) && nil

The first will always cause f to return nil; the second will return false (if g returns false) or nil (if g returns a truthy value).

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No, there is no other way than to either explicitly return nil or evaluate some other expression which implicitly evaluates to nil (e.g. ()).

If you want to add some kind of semantic marker that shows that you explicitly want to ignore the return value, you could invent some convention for that, e.g.:

def f(param)
  # some extra logic with param
  g(param) # I don't want to return the return of g

  ()
end

or

def f(param)
  # some extra logic with param
  g(param) # I don't want to return the return of g

  _=_
end

which will make those cases easily grepable but probably won't aid much in understanding.

This is a design choice of Ruby which it shares with many other expression-based languages: the value of a block/subroutine/procedure/function/method is the value of the last expression evaluated inside the block. That's how it works in Lisp, for example.

Note that there are other choices as well. E.g. in Smalltalk, the return value of a method must be explicitly returned using the operator, otherwise the return value is nil. In E, which is heavily focused on security, this is even a conscious design choice: automatically returning the value of the last expression is considered a potential information leak.

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3  
Note, of course, that the second example (_=_) only works if you haven’t previously defined a local variable or method named _ that returns something other than nil. (Though it is used as a name little outside of a block.) –  Andrew Marshall Jul 9 '13 at 2:31

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