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Imagine I have a CPAN-ish module I can't allow myself to modify directly Module::Cool which has the methods new, communicate_heartbeat, is_running, remove_heartbeat and prefix.

I want to use these methods, but I need to change "prefix" method a bit. I heard that you can create in your local, server, etc, a file like:

package My::Module::Cool;               

use strict;                              
use warnings;                            
use utf8;                                

use parent qw(Module::Cool);                                                                                                        

1; 

If I add a "sub prefix{ ....}" method here, when I try to use My::Module::Cool, which "prefix" method will prevail, the new one I wrote or the original coming from the parent module?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If those methods are functions (note: NOT part of a class, not something you've done my $instance = Module::Cool->new(); it won't do quite what you want. Subroutines exported by the parent module into your module won't be imported to your namespace (intentionally - it would break OO) with the use parent call since the 'parent' module is for extending objects only. If those are subroutines that just happen to have OO like names, Exporter (the module used for exporting functions) can do the trick.

First you have to bring the other functions you want into your module (with an import -- this is what use Cool::Module does behind the scenes anyway when it exports subroutines), build your own replacement function (invoking the original if needed), and exporting everything again.

Here's an example:

use strict;
use warnings;
use utf8;

# Make sure this happens at compile time, before anything else in the module
BEGIN {
    require Module::Cool; # make sure it loads, but don't import yet

    # get all the functions you want to normally import
    my @imports = grep { $_ ne 'prefix' } @Module::Cool::EXPORT;

    # Now do the actual import after filtering; see `perldoc use`.
    Module::Cool->import(@imports); 
};

require Exporter;
our @ISA = qw/Exporter/; # The 'Exporter' base class does function exporting
our @EXPORT = @Module::Cool::EXPORT; # same export list

sub prefix
{
    my @args = @_;

    # stuff before calling the original prefix

    Module::Cool::prefix(@_);

    # then do stuff after

    return ...; # and return as before.
}

1;

If Cool::Module doesn't auto-export, swap to @EXPORT_OK, and use the @EXPORT_OK list. See perldoc Exporter for more info.

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Yes. See: perlobj

From perlobj:

Method Resolution Order

Method resolution order only matters in the case of multiple inheritance. 
In the case of single inheritance, Perl simply looks up the inheritance 
chain to find a method:

    Grandparent
     |
    Parent
     |
    Child
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If those methods are part of a class, it'll work fine! :-)

PS C:\dev> perl
package My::Base;

use 5.012;
use warnings;

sub new { return bless {}, shift; }
sub frob { say "in base" }

package My::Child;

use 5.012;
use warnings;

use base 'My::Base';

sub frob { say "in child"; }

package main;

my $base = My::Base->new();
$base->frob();

my $child = My::Child->new();
$child->frob();

Gives:

in base
in child
PS C:\dev>

To call the parent function, use the special SUPER prefix. Modifying the example above to:

# in My::Child...   
sub frob {
    my $self = shift; 
    $self->SUPER::frob(); 
    say "in child"; 
}

gives...

in base
in base
in child

And now both the parent and the child are called when child's method is invoked.

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Here's a simple example if Module::Cool is OO.

Parent Class

package TestPackage;

use strict;
use warnings;

sub new {
    my $class = shift;
    my $self = {};

    bless $self, $class;
    return $self;
}
sub prefix {
    my $self = shift;

    return "TestPackage";
}

sub is_running {
    my $self = shift;

    return "duh";
}

1;

Child

package TestPackage2;

use warnings; 
use strict;

use base 'TestPackage';

sub prefix {
    my $self = shift;

    return "TestPackage2";
}

1;

some script using child class

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict; 
use warnings;

use TestPackage2;

my $tp2 = TestPackage2->new();

print $tp2->prefix(), "\n";
print $tp2->is_running(), "\n";

OUTPUT

$ test.pl
TestPackage2
duh
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