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I know the usage like:

Array.prototype.slice.call(document.querySelectorAll('a')) 

to turn Nodelist datatype to array without a parameter, but I read from the W3CSchool about the usage of slice, the first parameter start is required:

start Required. An integer that specifies where to start the selection (The first element has an index of 0). Use negative numbers to select from the end of an array

so without a parameter and call that method is just OK? Why this could success?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

Let's play a game of follow the breadcrumbs

In the es5 spec,

  1. Array.prototype.slice(start, end)

    Let relativeStart be ToInteger(start)

  2. ToInteger

    1. Let number be the result of calling ToNumber on the input argument

  3. ToNumber

    Undefined transforms to NaN

  4. Backtrack ToInteger

    2. If number is NaN, return +0.

So even though it is not explicitly stated to be optional, if start is undefined, it becomes 0.

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Better to use MDN than w3cschools/fools.

Yes, what you are doing is correct, see the "Array-like objects" section of:

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/slice

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2  
+1 "Better to use MDN than w3cschool/fools." – Paul S. Jul 9 '13 at 1:48
    
+1 for MDN and OP is right Array.prototype.slice.call(document.querySelectorAll('a')) should not work (it does in FF) because according to the documentation the begin parameter is not optional so you should use Array.prototype.slice.call(document.querySelectorAll('a'),0) You could introduce quirks leaving the begin parameter out like with an array sort function that returns true or false, works in FF but not in Chrome or Safari. – HMR Jul 9 '13 at 1:54
1  
@HMR I think you'll find you can leave out the first parameter in Chrome, too. Array.prototype.slice.call({length:2}); // [undefined × 2] – Paul S. Jul 9 '13 at 1:58
    
@PaulS. Your answer explains why it works (probably in all browsers) but I think it would be best to pass the begin parameter. The fact that it works is because of the browser implementation of converting undefined into a number but when properly implemented slice should trow an error (missing mandatory parameter). It's unlikely the implementation will change because it'll probably break a lot of scripts but you never know. – HMR Jul 9 '13 at 2:04
    
@HMR where does it say it is a "mandatory parameter" anywhere in the spec? As you can plainly see, the per-spec algorithm never says to throw an exception, unlike other algorithms such as Array.prototype.every where it has 4. If IsCallable(callbackfn) is false, throw a TypeError exception. – Paul S. Jul 9 '13 at 3:04

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