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I have an ajax call, let's say callback (b), within the callback of another ajax call, let's say callback (a). In my code (b) depends on the success of ajax call (a). However, contrary to what I expected, ajax call (b) still completes successfully before the parent ajax call (a) completes.

Javascript

var ajaxAdata; //global

ajaxA(ajaxB(1));

function ajaxA(callback){
       FB.api('/me', function(response) { //ajax call(a)
            ajaxAdata = response.id; 
            callback(); // this completes before ajax call(a) completes
       }
}

ajaxB = function(isPublic) {
       .getJSON(){ //ajax call (b)
            console.log(ajaxAdata); // necessary ajaxAdata returns undefined
        }
}

Am I ignorant of something in regards to javascript here? I've read in many places that a callback function is the right way to handle asynch calls. In this case, does javascript still read ahead into the ajaxB function and starts to execute .getJSON() before the FB.api() call is complete?

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where is ajaxB called? –  OneOfOne Jul 9 '13 at 2:12
    
I'm trying to call it as callback() in ajaxA. –  Gnuey Jul 9 '13 at 2:13
    
Perfect, thank you all for the answers. The sequence of calls were as desired after the fix. –  Gnuey Jul 9 '13 at 2:24
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
ajaxA(ajaxB(1));

Is actually executing ajaxB,, and then using the result to pass as an argument to ajaxA.

You need to pass in the function, not the result.

So try

ajaxA(ajaxB);

Then, in ajaxA, pass in your argument to the callback with

callback(1);
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Ah, I see. Is it always the case that if I pass in a function call with an argument within the parameter, such as ajaxB(1), it will execute in that call? Because I know in ajaxA(function(){...}); the anonymous function should not execute... –  Gnuey Jul 9 '13 at 2:16
1  
Yes, because specifying the argument of a defined function is the syntax for calling the function. The closure you're creating doesn't include the calling syntax ( e.g. var func = function(arg) { console.log(arg); }("We are calling the closure here"); ) –  keelerm Jul 9 '13 at 2:18
    
Any expression of the form fun1(fun2(arg)) runs fun2 first, and then runs fun1 with its return value as the argument. –  Barmar Jul 9 '13 at 2:18
    
For instance alert(parseInt("123")) first calls parseInt, then calls alert. –  Barmar Jul 9 '13 at 2:19
    
Ah, right. I forgot about that in my attempt to shorten code. My ajaxB function is large, so I did not want to pass an entire function as an argument in the parameter. I will take a look at my code again. –  Gnuey Jul 9 '13 at 2:20
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Your call

ajaxA(ajaxB(1));

executes ajaxB(1) before ajaxA is even invoked to provide the value of parameter for ajaxA.

It should be

ajaxA(ajaxB, 1);

and

function ajaxA(callback, param){
       FB.api('/me', function(response) { //ajax call(a)
            ajaxAdata = response.id; 
            callback(param); // this completes before ajax call(a) completes
       }
}
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It should be:

ajaxA(function() {ajaxB(1);} );

You were calling ajaxB() first, and passing its return value (undefined) as the callback argument to ajaxA(). You want to pass a function that calls ajaxB() as the callback.

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You are executing ajaxB here:

ajaxB(1)

I think what you want to do is either return a function from ajaxB or find a way to pass the isPublic flag to your ajaxA function like:

ajaxA(ajaxB, 1);

function ajaxA(callback, isPublic){
       FB.api('/me', function(response) { //ajax call(a)
            ajaxAdata = response.id; 
            callback(isPublic); // this completes before ajax call(a) completes
       }
}
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Ah, that makes sense. Thank you I will try this out. –  Gnuey Jul 9 '13 at 2:18
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