Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know that vectorized functions are the preferred way to write code for speed, but I can't figure out a way to do what this function does without loops. The way I have written this function results in an extremely slow completion time. (Passing two dataframes with 100 columns and 2000 rows as arguments, this function takes 100 seconds to complete. I was hoping more for like 1 second.)

def gen_fuzz_logic_signal(longp, shortp):
    # Input dataframes should have 0, -1, or 1 value
    flogic_signal = pd.DataFrame(index = longp.index, columns = longp.columns)
    for sym in longp.columns:
        print sym
        prev_enter = 0
        for inum in range(0, len(longp.index)):
            cur_val = np.nan
            if longp.ix[inum, sym] == 0  and prev_enter == +1:
                cur_val = 0.5
            if shortp.ix[inum, sym] == 0 and prev_enter == -1:
                cur_val = -0.5
            if longp.ix[inum, sym] == 1 and shortp.ix[inum, sym] == -1:
                if longp.ix[inum - 1, sym] != 1:
                    cur_val = 1
                    prev_enter = 1
                elif shortp.ix[inum - 1, sym] != -1:
                    cur_val = -1
                    prev_enter = -1
                else:
                    cur_val = prev_enter
            else:
                if longp.ix[inum, sym] == 1:
                    cur_val = 1
                    prev_enter = 1
                if shortp.ix[inum, sym] == -1:
                    cur_val = -1
                    prev_enter = -1
            flogic_signal.ix[inum, sym] = cur_val
    return flogic_signal

The inputs to the function are simply two dataframes with values of either 1, -1, or 0. I would really appreciate it if anyone had ideas for how to vectorize this or speed it up. I tried replacing the ".ix[inum, sym]" with "[sym][inum]" but that's even slower.

           GOOG longp GOOG shortp GOOG func result
2011-07-28          0          -1               -1
2011-07-29          0          -1               -1
2011-08-01          0          -1               -1
2011-08-02          0          -1               -1
2011-08-03          0          -1               -1
2011-08-04          0          -1               -1
2011-08-05          0          -1               -1
2011-08-08          0           0             -0.5
2011-08-09          0           0             -0.5
2011-08-10          0           0             -0.5
2011-08-11          0           0             -0.5
2011-08-12          1           0                1
2011-08-15          1           0                1
2011-08-16          1           0                1
2011-08-17          1           0                1
2011-08-18          1           0                1
2011-08-19          1           0                1
2011-08-22          1           0                1
2011-08-23          1           0                1
2011-08-24          1           0                1
2011-08-25          1           0                1
2011-08-26          1           0                1
2011-08-29          1           0                1
2011-08-30          1           0                1
2011-08-31          1           0                1
2011-09-01          1           0                1
2011-09-02          1           0                1
2011-09-06          1           0                1
2011-09-07          1           0                1
2011-09-08          1           0                1
2011-09-09          1           0                1
2011-09-12          1           0                1
2011-09-13          1           0                1
2011-09-14          1           0                1
2011-09-15          1           0                1
2011-09-16          1           0                1
2011-09-19          1           0                1
2011-09-20          1           0                1
2011-09-21          1           0                1
2011-09-22          1           0                1
2011-09-23          1           0                1
2011-09-26          1           0                1
2011-09-27          1           0                1
2011-09-28          1           0                1
2011-09-29          0           0              0.5
2011-09-30          0          -1               -1
2011-10-03          0          -1               -1
2011-10-04          0          -1               -1
2011-10-05          0          -1               -1
2011-10-06          0          -1               -1
2011-10-07          0          -1               -1
2011-10-10          0          -1               -1
2011-10-11          0          -1               -1
2011-10-12          0          -1               -1
2011-10-13          0          -1               -1
2011-10-14          0          -1               -1
2011-10-17          0          -1               -1
2011-10-18          0          -1               -1
2011-10-19          0          -1               -1
2011-10-20          0          -1               -1


           IBM longp IBM shortp IBM func result
2012-05-01         1         -1               1
2012-05-02         1         -1               1
2012-05-03         1         -1               1
2012-05-04         1         -1               1
2012-05-07         1         -1               1
2012-05-08         1          0               1
2012-05-09         1          0               1
2012-05-10         1          0               1
2012-05-11         1          0               1
2012-05-14         1          0               1
2012-05-15         1          0               1
2012-05-16         0         -1              -1
2012-05-17         0         -1              -1
2012-05-18         0         -1              -1
2012-05-21         0         -1              -1
2012-05-22         0         -1              -1
2012-05-23         0         -1              -1
2012-05-24         0         -1              -1
2012-05-25         0         -1              -1
2012-05-29         0         -1              -1
2012-05-30         0         -1              -1
2012-05-31         0         -1              -1
2012-06-01         0         -1              -1
2012-06-04         0         -1              -1
2012-06-05         0         -1              -1
2012-06-06         0         -1              -1
2012-06-07         0         -1              -1
2012-06-08         1         -1               1
2012-06-11         1         -1               1
2012-06-12         1         -1               1
2012-06-13         1         -1               1
2012-06-14         1         -1               1
2012-06-15         1         -1               1
2012-06-18         1         -1               1
2012-06-19         1         -1               1
2012-06-20         1         -1               1
2012-06-21         1          0               1
2012-06-22         1          0               1
2012-06-25         1          0               1
2012-06-26         1          0               1
2012-06-27         1          0               1
2012-06-28         1          0               1
2012-06-29         1          0               1

EDIT:

I just reran some old code that used similar looping through a pandas DataFrame to set values. It used to take maybe 5 seconds, and now I see it's taking maybe 100x that. I'm wondering if this issue is due to something that changed in the more recent version of pandas. That's the only variable I can think of that's changed. See this code below. This takes 73 seconds to run on my computer using Pandas 0.11. This seems very slow for a pretty basic function albeit one that operates elementwise, but still. If anyone has a chance, I'd be curious how long the below takes on your computer and your version of pandas.

import time
import numpy as np
import pandas as pd
def timef(func, *args):
    start= time.clock()
    for i in range(2):
        func(*args)
    end= time.clock()
    time_complete = (end-start)/float(2)
    print time_complete

def tfunc(num_row, num_col):
    df = pd.DataFrame(index = np.arange(1,num_row), columns = np.arange(1,num_col))
    for col in df.columns:
        for inum in range(1, len(df.index)):
            df.ix[inum, col] = 0 #np.nan
    return df

timef(tfunc, 1000, 1000)  <<< This takes 73 seconds on a Core i5 M460 2.53gz Windows 7 laptop.

EDIT 2 7-9-13 1:23pm:

I found a temporary solution! I changed the code to the below. Essentially converted each column to an ndarray, and then assembled the new column in a python list before inserting back into a column in the new pandas DataFrame. To do 50 columns of about 2000 rows using the old version above took 101 seconds. The version below takes only 0.19 seconds! Fast enough for me for now. Not sure why .ix is so slow. Like I said above, in earlier versions of pandas I believe elementwise operations were much faster.

def gen_fuzz_logic_signal3(longp, shortp):
    # Input dataframes should have 0 or 1 value
    flogic_signal = pd.DataFrame(index = longp.index, columns = longp.columns)
    for sym in longp.columns:
        coll = longp[sym].values
        cols = shortp[sym].values
        prev_enter = 0
        newcol = [None] * len(coll)
        for inum in range(1, len(coll)):
            cur_val = np.nan
            if coll[inum] == 0  and prev_enter == +1:
                cur_val = 0.5
            if cols[inum] == 0 and prev_enter == -1:
                cur_val = -0.5
            if coll[inum] == 1 and cols[inum] == -1:
                if coll[inum -1] != 1:
                    cur_val = 1
                    prev_enter = 1
                elif cols[inum-1] != -1:
                    cur_val = -1
                    prev_enter = -1
                else:
                    cur_val = prev_enter
            else:
                if coll[inum] == 1:
                    cur_val = 1
                    prev_enter = 1
                if cols[inum] == -1:
                    cur_val = -1
                    prev_enter = -1
            newcol[inum] = cur_val
        flogic_signal[sym] = newcol
    return flogic_signal
share|improve this question
6  
Can you explain the goal of the function instead of leaving readers to puzzle it out by reading the code? –  BrenBarn Jul 9 '13 at 2:20
    
This is a financial data problem. Longp is a dataframe consisting of 1s or 0s. 1 means buy or hold the security. 0 means sell or remain cash. Shortp consists of -1 or 0. -1 is sell short or remain short. 0 is go to cash or remain in cash. This function is to combine the long and short position series into one signal, where 1 means buy or hold, 0.5 means exit the buy position or remain in cash, -1 means short or remain short, and -0.5 means exit the short or remain in cash. –  geronimo Jul 9 '13 at 3:01
    
I added some example data and desired results. Please let me know if additional clarification is needed. –  geronimo Jul 9 '13 at 3:30
    
Example is too involved for the site, try to simplify it (and then you can extend the ideas we give in our answers). Don't use for loops, this looks like it can be vectorized... –  Andy Hayden Jul 9 '13 at 9:05
1  
Simplify the function or the example data? –  geronimo Jul 9 '13 at 12:52

1 Answer 1

I believe .ix implementation did change in 0.11. (http://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/whatsnew.html) Not sure if its related.

One quick speedup I got on 0.10.1 is when I changed tfunc to below to cache the column/series being updated

def tfunc(num_row, num_col):
   df = pd.DataFrame(index = np.arange(1,num_row), columns = np.arange(1,num_col))
   for col in df.columns:
       sdf = df[col]
       for inum in range(1, len(df.index)):
           sdf.ix[inum] = 0 #np.nan
   return df

It went from ~80 to ~9 on my machine

share|improve this answer
    
Is this function doing something other that pd.DataFrame(0, index = np.arange(1,num_row), columns = np.arange(1,num_col), dtype='float') besides having a final row of NaN ? –  Andy Hayden Jul 11 '13 at 11:42
    
I believe it's a test function that mimics the original loop being profiled –  user1827356 Jul 11 '13 at 13:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.