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I made 4 progress bars out of CSS, and inserted them into my container, however I cant get them to move from the left without it messing up, I want them to be so that when people resize the browser window it also moves with it.

IMAGE 1: This is what happens when I add a "Position: _" property:

snapshot

Without the position property, it seems to stay and move correctly, which is good except I now want to move the bars around as I desire on the page.

HTML

<div class="meter">
  <span style="width: 90%"></span>
</div>
<div class="meter">
  <span style="width: 70%"></span>
</div>
<div class="meter">
  <span style="width: 50%"></span>
</div>
<div class="meter">
  <span style="width: 90%"></span>
</div>

CSS

.meter { 
  height: 15px;  /* Can be anything */
        margin-bottom: 10px;
  top: 80px;
    left: 600px;
    background: #555;
    -moz-border-radius: 25px;
    -webkit-border-radius: 25px;
    border-radius: 25px;
        width: 210px;
    padding: 0px;
    -webkit-box-shadow: inset 0 -1px 1px rgba(255,255,255,0.3);
    -moz-box-shadow   : inset 0 -1px 1px rgba(255,255,255,0.3);
    box-shadow        : inset 0 -1px 1px rgba(255,255,255,0.3);
}
.meter > span {
  display: block;
    height: 100%;
       -webkit-border-top-right-radius: 8px;
    -webkit-border-bottom-right-radius: 8px;
           -moz-border-radius-topright: 8px;
        -moz-border-radius-bottomright: 8px;
               border-top-right-radius: 8px;
            border-bottom-right-radius: 8px;
        -webkit-border-top-left-radius: 20px;
     -webkit-border-bottom-left-radius: 20px;
            -moz-border-radius-topleft: 20px;
         -moz-border-radius-bottomleft: 20px;
                border-top-left-radius: 20px;
             border-bottom-left-radius: 20px;
    background-color: rgb(43,194,83);
    background-image: -webkit-gradient(
      linear,
      left bottom,
      left top,
      color-stop(0, rgb(43,194,83)),
      color-stop(1, rgb(84,240,84))
     );
    background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(
      center bottom,
      rgb(43,194,83) 67%,
      rgb(84,240,84) 69%
     );
    background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(
      center bottom,
      rgb(43,194,83) 37%,
      rgb(84,240,84) 69%
     );
    background-image: -ms-linear-gradient(
      center bottom,
      rgb(43,194,83) 37%,
      rgb(84,240,84) 69%
     );
    background-image: -o-linear-gradient(
      center bottom,
      rgb(43,194,83) 37%,
      rgb(84,240,84) 69%
     );
    -webkit-box-shadow: 
      inset 0 2px 9px  rgba(255,255,255,0.3),
      inset 0 -2px 6px rgba(0,0,0,0.4);
    -moz-box-shadow: 
      inset 0 2px 9px  rgba(255,255,255,0.3),
      inset 0 -2px 6px rgba(0,0,0,0.4);
    position: relative;
    overflow: hidden;
}

DEMO

(If the answer is some type of float, noticed what happens to the progress bars when you add a "float: right;" in the CSS Desk link I provided above, try adding a float to the code. The bars become vertical aligned)

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just add these CSS rules to the .meter class:

float: right;
clear: right;

Here's the Fiddle.

Leo!

EDIT: If you want to move an element "under your control" (not occurred to me a better definition) and inside the container (I mean, not with respect to the browser's window) just add these CSS rules:

To the parent element:

position: relative;

To the child element:

position: absolute;
top: value;
right: value;
left: value;
bottom: value;

Where top, right, left and bottom properties are to move the element "under your control".

I hope that you understand me.


This is the difference between add the position: absolute to the child without add the position: relative to parent, and do it:

Markup:

<div>
  <img src="images/img.png" />
  <p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet....</p>
</div>

CSS:

div img {
  position: absolute;
  top:  50px; 
  left: 50px;
}

enter image description here

As you can see the reference to make the position is the browser's window.

BUT, if you add the position: relative; to the parent...

div {
  border: 2px solid #CCC;
  padding: 1em;
  margin: 1em 0 1em 4em;
  width: 300px;
  position: relative;
}

div img {
  position: absolute;
  top: 50px; 
  left: 50px;
}

enter image description here

The reference is the parent element.


The pictures were obtain from http://www.librosweb.com (a great site to learn about web technologies - in spanish).

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, but It just did the same issue except now its stuck on the right side instead of the left.... I want to be able to position them around together as one. I tried adding "left: __px;" or "top__px;" but nothing happened? Thanks –  John Dylan Jul 9 '13 at 5:35
    
Sorry, but I didn't understand what you want... Can you be more specific? What do you mean with "around"? To the center? Or some position in the screen? –  leoMestizo Jul 9 '13 at 5:38
    
Oh sure. I just mean to be able to custom move them a little more to the center, maybe farther downwards in the page, or 90 pixels from the right, or maybe 50 pixels from the right, etc... That type of thing, so its not just fixed/stuck to the right edge of the page. Thanks –  John Dylan Jul 9 '13 at 5:42
    
I've updated the post. Don't forget to create a "container" element for wrap the .meter elements with their respective childs. If you don't want to modify the markup, just add the position: relative; to the body (or the preceded element). –  leoMestizo Jul 9 '13 at 5:51
1  
Also, read this: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/position :) –  Dave Jul 9 '13 at 5:53

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