Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to know how to do the following.

I have a console application which looks like this:

Data data;

while(true)
{
   // use data for calculations

   if (Timer())
   {
      data = RefreshData();
   }
}

Timer() returns true if the time elapsed since the last RefreshData() call equals to the time it takes to run RefreshData() plus five minutes.

I'd like to run RefreshData() with the same periodicity, but asynchronously, meanwhile using current value of data in the while loop and replacing it with the new value upon RefreshData() completion.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Consider using await instead of waiting synchronously for the Delay task. This will help in scheduling the RefreshData more efficiently.

Task.Run( async () =>
{
    while (true)
    {
        await Task.Delay( desiredInterval );
        RefreshData();
    }
});

All that said, you may however want to change the design of your app. Instead of periodically polling to refresh data, you may want to subscribe to your data source's change event, if any. If your data source is a database and you want to cache latest data, until it changes in the database, you may consider using MemoryCache and an appropriate cache policy for expiration.

share|improve this answer
    
more on async-await efficiency: thinqlinq.com/Post.aspx/Title/Async-Await-StateMachine-in-ILSpy –  astef Jul 9 '13 at 8:05
    
and about using it in loops: thinqlinq.com/Post.aspx/Title/Async-in-loops –  astef Jul 9 '13 at 8:05
    
finally, run this code: pastebin.com/ufhaM6dd remember application memory usage in task manager, wait 10 minutes, check it again –  astef Jul 9 '13 at 8:08
    
@astef: i think you are blurring line between efficiency and performance. Since we already have Task.Delay() I don't think performance is required. Using Wait() synchronously blocks the thread and makes it a long running task. This is inefficient for TPL. That answers your first comment. –  YK1 Jul 9 '13 at 9:09
    
Second, blog author is running something in a loop with await, which he wants to happen in parallel. Here, we dont want to call multiple RefreshData in parallel. That answers second comment. –  YK1 Jul 9 '13 at 9:09

I propose you to do a think like this :

Timer timer;

public void StartTimer()
{
    timer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(OnTimedEvent);
    // Set the Interval 
    timer.Interval = 2000;
    timer.Enabled = true;
}

private void OnTimedEvent(object source, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    data = RefreshData();
}

It will asynchronously refresh data, with your a specify interval.

Hope it's help

share|improve this answer
    
a small concern: How do you assert that data is not being used when a new value is assigned to it? Thread safety? –  now he who must not be named. Jul 9 '13 at 9:43
using System.Threading.Tasks;

// ...

Data data;

Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
{
    while (true)
    {
        Task.Delay(5 * 60 * 1000).Wait();
        RefreshData();
    }
}, TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);

// use data for calculations

Consider using CancellationToken for cancelling refreshing data.

Consider locking data for thread-safety.

share|improve this answer
    
Using Wait() synchronously blocks the thread and makes it a long running task. This is inefficient for TPL. –  YK1 Jul 9 '13 at 9:12
    
Actually, that is a long-running task. Though, you're right, it must be marked explicitly. I've edited answer –  astef Jul 9 '13 at 9:16
    
It is still not efficient even if you mark it that way - though it may not use thread pool thread, it makes the TPL create an extra thread for you and then you are blocking it synchronously. –  YK1 Jul 9 '13 at 9:32
    
"It is still not efficient" - why? –  astef Jul 9 '13 at 9:35
    
because - it makes the TPL create an extra thread for you and then you are blocking it synchronously –  YK1 Jul 9 '13 at 9:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.