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Input file

1. blue is color
2. His shirt color is blue and it is good
3. deep blue see is a movie

output:

1. blue is color
2. blue and it is good
3. blue see is a movie

I need the output that start from specific word to last column in unix, using awk or cut.

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closed as off-topic by devnull, M42, daxim, JDB, HamZa Jul 17 '13 at 14:21

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave these specific reasons:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – JDB, HamZa
  • "Questions must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Tell us what you've tried to do, why it didn't work, and how it should work. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – devnull, M42, daxim
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2  
I need the output that start from ... -- What did you try? –  devnull Jul 9 '13 at 7:09
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
awk 'BEGIN{FS="\\<blue\\>"; OFS="blue"}{$1=""}7' file

the above line will output:

kent$  awk 'BEGIN{FS="\\<blue\\>"; OFS="blue"}{$1=""}7' file                                                                                                                   
blue is color
blue and it is good
blue see is a movie

Note that "\\<blue\\>" will match exactly word blue, not bluesky or darkblue I hope this is what you want.

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Thanks for the hint, added a word boundary. –  captcha Jul 9 '13 at 7:33
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Code for :

$ sed -r 's/^([0-9]+. ).* (blue)\b/\1\2/' file
1. blue is color
2. blue and it is good
3. blue see is a movie
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This is a pretty common use case,

cat test.txt | awk '{ if (x=index($0,"blue")) { print substr($0,x,length($0)); } }'

I would recommend you to take a look at Awk - A Tutorial and Introduction

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1  
and it is a pretty common useless cat call. –  Kent Jul 9 '13 at 7:18
    
It's not going to make much difference, unless you're on a very loaded system –  hostmaster Jul 9 '13 at 7:34
1  
true, it's not going to make much difference for this example, however when learn/do things, and if there is clearly a better option, I would go that way. Well if you think single process is not better than multiple but useless processes, you could keep your opinion. –  Kent Jul 9 '13 at 7:43
    
I agree with you up to the point. However, I'm always thinking about real cases. I mean in a real case it would be a chain in a large pipeline of commands so from my point of view 'awk "{CODE}" file' is the degenerate case –  hostmaster Jul 9 '13 at 10:14
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In Perl:

perl -nle'/(blue.*)/&&print"$1\n"'
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