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I am learning Spring MVC .

To configure servlet mapping in web.xml.

Who can tell what's difference between them

<servlet-name>login</servlet-name>
<url-pattern>/login/</url-pattern>

<servlet-name>login</servlet-name>
<url-pattern>/login</url-pattern>

<servlet-name>login</servlet-name>
<url-pattern>/</url-pattern>

<servlet-name>login</servlet-name>
<url-pattern>/*</url-pattern>

<servlet-name>login</servlet-name>
<url-pattern>/*.do</url-pattern>

Maybe more...

It is really necessary for me to know ,so that a new servlet will not be Intercept by other ones.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted
<servlet-name>login</servlet-name>
<url-pattern>/login</url-pattern>

This is exact url pattern, this servlet will be invoked only if the url is like someThing.com/login

<servlet-name>login</servlet-name>
<url-pattern>/*</url-pattern>

This is directory url pattern. So /someString or /someOtherString or /some/someOther will invoke the same login servlet.

<servlet-name>login</servlet-name>
<url-pattern>/*.do</url-pattern>

This is extension url pattern. Anything that is suffixed as .do will map to this. e.g. /someUrl.do or /some/someOther.do will invoke the login servlet.

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Give a example of request that distinguish ( /* and / ) , thanks – karl li Jul 9 '13 at 8:35
    
I am not very sure about the distinction between /* and / to be frank so did not give an example for the same. Maybe @Kevin will explain it. – Prasad Kharkar Jul 9 '13 at 8:41
    
@karlli / just maps the root, /* maps everything - asterix is a wildcard. – NimChimpsky Jul 9 '13 at 10:32

this looks rather strange,you have this

<servlet-name>login</servlet-name>
<url-pattern>/*</url-pattern>

and thats all you need, the rest of the mapping are supercilious. But calling your spring servlet login is a bit weird. Normally you would call it spring-servlet or similar, everything is then mapped to that servlet, and specific request mappings are handled by different controllers - you can use RequestMappign annoation on controller methods.

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