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I want to calculate a derived data type in a subroutine (or function). How would I reference the variable in the subroutine arguments?

So far, I can achieve my objective by referencing the entire object, then referencing the variable inside the subroutine. Is there a way to reference only the variable myObj%var in the subroutine arguments?

PROGRAM test

    TYPE obj
        INTEGER :: var
    END TYPE obj

    TYPE (obj) :: myObj
    CALL set(myObj)
    PRINT*, myObj%var

        CONTAINS

    SUBROUTINE set(myObj)
        TYPE (obj) :: myObj
        myObj%var = 5
    END SUBROUTINE set

END PROGRAM test
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2 Answers 2

You could simply write

SUBROUTINE set(an_int)
    integer, intent(inout) :: an_int
    an_int = 5
END SUBROUTINE set

and then call the subroutine like this:

CALL set(myObj%var)

My opinion that it is perverse to package components into derived types and then unpack them to pass to procedures is just an opinion, you are free to ignore it. Personally I'd go with a more radical rewrite of your code, something like the following. Be warned though that this uses some features introduced in the 2003 standard, though these are implemented in current editions of the most widely used compilers.

MODULE mytype

  IMPLICIT NONE

  TYPE obj
     INTEGER, PRIVATE :: var
   CONTAINS
     PROCEDURE, PASS :: get_var
     PROCEDURE, PASS :: set_var
  END TYPE obj

CONTAINS

  SUBROUTINE set_var(this,an_int)
    CLASS(obj), INTENT(inout) :: this
    INTEGER, INTENT(in) :: an_int
    this%var = an_int
  END SUBROUTINE set_var

  INTEGER FUNCTION get_var(this)
    CLASS(obj), INTENT(inout) :: this
    get_var = this%var
  END FUNCTION get_var

END MODULE mytype


PROGRAM test

  USE mytype
  IMPLICIT NONE 

  TYPE (obj) :: myObj
  CALL myobj%set_var(12)
  PRINT*, myObj%get_var()

END PROGRAM test
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I agree I wouldn't make an object just to initialize it's variables with a function. I was trying a test version. Ultimately, I would be making calculations using different variables from different objects. –  jgoldst1 Jul 9 '13 at 12:47

If you only have an F95 compiler without all the 2003/2008 bits, this is how it can be done.

MODULE ObjMod
  IMPLICIT NONE

  TYPE ObjType
     INTEGER, PRIVATE :: var
  END TYPE ObjType

CONTAINS

  SUBROUTINE ObjCreate(this)
     TYPE(ObjType), POINTER :: this
     allocate(this)
  END SUBROUTINE ObjCreate

  SUBROUTINE ObjDelete(this)
     TYPE(ObjType), POINTER :: this
     deallocate (this)
  END SUBROUTINE ObjDelete

  SUBROUTINE ObjSet(this, value)
     TYPE(ObjType), INTENT(inout) :: this
     INTEGER, INTENT(in) :: value
     this%var = value
  END SUBROUTINE ObjSet

 INTEGER FUNCTION ObjGet(this)
    TYPE(ObjType), INTENT(inout) :: this
    ObjGet = this%var
 END FUNCTION ObjGet

END MODULE ObjMod


PROGRAM test

 USE ObjMod
 IMPLICIT NONE 

 TYPE (ObjType), POINTER :: testObj

 CALL ObjCreate(testObj)
 CALL ObjSet(testObj, 12)
 PRINT*, ObjGet(testObj)
 CALL ObjDelete(testObj)
 STOP
END PROGRAM test

I also used to code like that in C in the early 80s before a decent C++ compiler came out. What you will find is that many systems written in the 70s up to the early 90s use this technique. It will work in any language that supports structures and dynamic memory allocation.

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